Thursday, December 31, 2009

Julian "Cannonball" ADDERLEY Quintet - Mercy,Mercy,Mercy! Live At "The Club" 1967


Julian "Cannonball" ADDERLEY Quintet - Mercy,Mercy,Mercy! Live At "The Club" 1967
ST-2663
Recorded live at Capitol Studios, Los Angeles, California on October 20, 1966

Jazz

In Los Angeles during the fall of 1966, Cannonball Adderley and his crack quintet laid down one of the most joyous, defining statements in the history of hard bop. MERCY, MERCY, MERCY, recorded live before a select and very vocal audience at Capitol Tower's capacious Studio A, presages the funkybutt rhythm changes and hollering gospel testimonies that distinguish contemporary jazz and new jack fusion, but with a greasy vitality and cerebral harmonic elegance often lacking in today's imitations.

The Cannonball Adderley Quintet of 1966 was a juggernaut of swing. Whether romping through complex bebop variations ("Hippodelphia"), dipping into sanctified waters with a hot-wired boogaloo arrangement ("Sticks"), or combining the two moods in an exhilirating game of vamp and release ("Fun"), their years of bandstand experience added up to the kind of deep feeling that sequencers will never sample. On Cannonball's closing "Sack O' Woe," drummer Roy McCurdy, bassist Victor Gaskin and that unlikeliest of funkateers, the Austrian pianist Josef Zawinul (some four years before Weather Report), essay what seem like a compendium of the most celebratory church beats since the Civil War, as the altoist and his cornet-wielding brother testify fervently about better times coming.

But on an album full of toe-tapping, high-flying, good time music, it is Zawinul's classic title tune that pays the freight. "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy" was an unlikely top 10 hit, and inspired scores of jazz wannabes. Zawinul's use of the Wurlitzer electric piano gives "Mercy, Mercy, Mercy" much of its smoky, down-home, after-hours ambience. Yet, it's the telepathic interplay and supple dynamics of the rhythm section, and the ardent vocal amens of the Adderley brothers that give this tune such a classic glow.
**
Cannonball Adderley- (Alto Sax);
Nat Adderley- (Cornet);
Joe Zawinul- (Acoustic & Electric Pianos);
Victor Gaskin- (Bass);
Roy McCurdy- (Drums).
**
A1. Fun   8:26
A2. Games   7:19
A3. Mercy, Mercy, Mercy   5:10
B1. Sticks   3:54
B2. Hippodelphia   5:49
B3. Sack o' Woe   10:29
**
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Etta JAMES, Albert COLLINS, Joe WALSH - Jump the Blues Away 1989


Etta JAMES, Albert COLLINS, Joe WALSH - Jump the Blues Away 1989

Blues

Nothing if not eclectic, the Jazzvisions series veers completely away from jazz on its blues installment. The idiom is blues-rock, the headliner is the once and future Eagles star Joe Walsh, and his co-partners are electric bluesman Albert Collins and the indestructible singer Etta James. Within that idiom, though, this is a strong program captained by experts in the arts of blues licks and working the crowd. Collins is terse and stinging on guitar, full of bent-note soul; James is right in her element, laying on the double entendres, whipping up the audience in her experienced manner; and Walsh, aside from the inevitable "Rocky Mountain Way," does well in the blues guitar idiom, even giving a tip of the cap to Collins, "Thanks for all the licks!" The backup band roars in the traditional journeyman electric blues-rock form, with strong piano and organ work and pumping drums. At its best, especially when Collins and James are on, this concert at the indoor Wiltern Theatre has much of the celebratory flavor of a jumping outdoor blues festival. Available on LP, CD, cassette, laserdisc and VHS video.
By Richard S. Ginell, All Music Guide.
**
01. Intro  :47
02. Walk Away  3:47
03. Goin' Down  5:35
04. Moon Is Full  6:47
05. Sweet Little Angel  5:51
06. Rock Me Baby  4:42
07. If Trouble Was Money  8:59
08. Baby, What You Want Me to Do?  4:52
09. Blues Don't Care  6:37
10. Rocky Mountain Way  6:37
**
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Jimmy THACKERY & The DRIVERS - Sinner Street 2000


Jimmy THACKERY & The DRIVERS - Sinner Street 2000

Blues

On his eighth album, Jimmy Thackery churns out rugged, no-nonsense, authoritative rock, with a passion and commitment that seeps through every track. Thackery's grinding guitar and growling voice pound out each song as if he's playing for thousands of people. He is produced once again by the experienced Jim Gaines who, through his work with Stevie Ray Vaughan, Albert Collins, Tommy Castro, and Santana, knows his way around a blues-rock record. The uncut Stonesy chug of "Never Enough" and "Lovin' My Money" is offset by the harder-edged funk of "Grab the Rafters" and the easier jazz shuffle of "Bad News." Saxist Jimmy Carpenter, new to the Thackery band, adds a soulful honk on the latter tune, gradually shifting the disc into more subtle territory. When the band starts wading into swampy waters like on the deep, dark groove of the album's instrumental title track, Carpenter provides a rough bed for the guitarist's poker-hot solo to nuzzle next to. Thackery's gruff and unremarkable voice remains his most limiting asset, and may be the reason his music hasn't crossed over like that of the more ostentatious Kenny Wayne Shepherd and Jonny Lang. But similar to most blues guitarists, the song is secondary to its presentation, and when Thackery unleashes his barely contained six-string fury, there are few who can compare. Considering the bluesman's arena is predominantly the live stage, Sinner Street is another extraordinarily strong entry into his catalog. Established blues-rock fans will naturally devour this whole, but the disc is as good a place as any for the novice to enjoy one of the more overlooked talents in the field.
By Hal Horowitz. AMG.
**
Jimmy Thackery- (Vocals, Guitar);
Mark Stutso- (Vocals, Drums);
Jimmy Carpenter- (Sax, Background Vocals);
Ken Faltinson- (Keyboards, Bass, Background Vocals);
Reba Russell- (Background Vocals).
**
01. Grab The Rafters 4:02
02. Bad News 4:24
03. Sinner Street (Instrumental) 4:14
04. Lovin' My Money 5:05
05. Chained To The Blues Line 5:01
06. Detroit Iron 5:05
07. Hundreds Into Ones 4:16
08. Never Enough 4:27
09. Million Dollar Bill 3:43
10. Havin' A Heart 5:18
11. Blues 'Fore Dawn (Instrumental) 5:02
**
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Peter GREEN with Fleetwood Mc - Live at the BBC 1995


Peter GREEN with Fleetwood Mc - Live at the BBC 1995
EDF CD 297
Recorded live between 1967 and 1971

Blues

Before they came to virtually define melodic Southern California rock in the late 1970s, Fleetwood Mac was a UK-based '60s blues-rock band, their style fueled by the electric American blues of Elmore James and Muddy Waters. Back then, the Mac's style was defined by the scorching guitar and impassioned vocals of Peter Green and the keening slide guitar of Jeremy Spencer. This three-CD set finds the band cutting loose on some of their favorite blues and early rock & roll songs, recorded live at the BBC studios between 1967 and 1971.
**
This album is great on a couple of levels.  One, is that close listen bears out the range of inspiration that came from Fleetwood Mac in general, and Peter Green in particular.  These guys influenced important music that would be recorded by The Beatles, Clapton, The Allman Brothers, Savoy Brown, and countless other blues based bands.  They were every bit as important to "Blues-Rock" as Zeppelin, Cream, and The Yardbirds.  They didn't achieve the fame because they chose to stay truer to the traditions of the music than their more famous counterparts.  And while that lack of flash may have cost them sales, it sure makes for some great listening.  Peter Green, Jeremy Spencer, and Danny Kirwan are outstanding.  And with the Fleetwood/McVie backbone behind them, they rarely fail to satisfy.  There are however a couple of downsides that cause me to give 4 stars rather than 5.  The most glaring to me is that while sincere and heartfelt, a little goes a long way when it comes to Jeremy Spencer's 50's tributes.  I could have done with 3 or so fewer of those in favor of some more blues.  Also, the tracks tend to be somewhat shorter than what Mac fans from this era have come to enjoy.  Fewer songs, and more solos might have been better, but in all fairness, the restrictions of live radio may have contributed to that situation.  These however are small complaints in the much larger picture of great British Blues by a band that needs to be appreciated more.
**
Peter Green- (Vocals, Guitar);
Jeremy Spencer- (Vocals, Slide Guitar, Guitar);
Danny Kirwan- (Vocals, Guitar);
John McVie- (Bass);
Mick Fleetwood- (Drums).
Additional personnel:
Nick Pickett, Christine Perfect, Eddie Boyd.

**
Cd 1
01. Rattlesnake Shake   7:38
02. Sandy Mary   5:00
03. Believe My Time Ain't Long   3:00
04. Although the Sun Is Shining   2:31
05. Only You   2:51
06. You Never Know What You're Missing   2:52
07. Oh Well   2:26
08. Can't Believe You Wanna Leave   3:25
09. Jenny Lee   2:19
10. Heavenly   2:37
11. When Will I Be Loved   2:13
12. When I See My Baby   2:11
13. Buddy's Song   2:09
14. Honey Hush   3:08
15. Preachin'   3:05
16. Jumping at Shadows   2:36
17. Preachin' Blues   1:59
18. Need Your Love So Bad   3:48

Cd 2
01. Long Grey Mare   2:53
02. Sweet Home Chicago   3:10
03. Baby Please Set a Date   2:59
04. Blues With a Feeling   2:56
05. Stop Messing Around   2:17
06. Tallahassee Lassie   3:24
07. Hang on to a Dream   2:56
08. Linda   2:03
09. Mean Mistreatin' Mama   4:03
10. World Keeps Turning   2:39
11. I Can't Hold Out   2:27
12. Early Morning Come   2:29
13. Albatross   2:48
14. Looking for Somebody   2:40
15. A Fool No More   3:40
16. Got to Move   2:57
17. Like Crying Like Dying   2:33
18. Man of the World   2:49
**
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Lonnie MACK - Attack of the Killer V, Live 1990


Lonnie MACK - Attack of the Killer V, Live 1990
Recorded live at Fitzgerald's in Berwyn, Illinois on December 14-16, 1989.

Blues

All songs written or co-written by Lonnie Mack except for "Riding The Blinds" (Nix) and "I Found A Love" (Pickett, West & Scofield).

Full Descriptionappreciative throng at FitzGerald's in suburban Chicago, Mack cuts loose the way he so often does in concert, sticking almost exclusively to his Alligator-era tunes ("Satisfy Suzie," "Cincinnati Jail," the tortured soul ballad "Stop") and never looking too far backwards.
By Bill Dahl. AMG.
**
In 1990, Mack returned to Alligator to record a live blues-rock album, Attack of the Killer V, featuring two extended guitar solos and expanded renditions of earlier studio recordings. From one review: "This disc has everything that a great live album should have: a great talent on stage, an exciting performance from that talent, a responsive crowd and excellent sound quality...This is what live blues is all about!"
**
Lonnie Mack- (Vocals, Guitar),
Dumpy Rice- (Piano),
Michael Freeman- (Bass),
Maxwell Schauf- (Drums).
Additional personnel:
Calvin Bridges, Ann Bridges- (Background Vocals on "I Found A Love").
**
01. Riding The Blinds 4:22
02. Natural Disaster 4:20
03. Stop 9:25
04. Camp Washington Chile/If You Have To Know 7:34
05. Satisfy Suzie 4:57
06. I Found A Love 7:26
07. The Move 3:35
08. Cincinnati Jail 8:34
**
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Tina TURNER - Live in Amsterdam, Wildest Dreams Tour - DTS (Avi) 1996


Tina TURNER - Live in Amsterdam, Wildest Dreams Tour - DTS (Avi) 1996
(Not My Rip)

Blues

Wonderfully directed, Wildest Dreams Tour makes a viewer feel practically omnipresent at Tina Turner's 1996, three-night stand in the Amsterdam Arena. With camera angles seemingly coming from everywhere, the massive scope of Turner's show is put into a proper, and enjoyable, visual context, along with the star's own artful way of reaching 50,000 fans at a shot with fierce energy but an unmistakably nuanced performance. Turner's secret weapon: her voice, with its whiplash gospel, survivor's pride, and endless capacity for ecstasy. It doesn't matter if she's dancing as if her life depended on it or launching tiny ripples of erotic warmth with the barest of gestures: she still flaunts for this Dutch crowd her share of Jerry Lee Lewis's profane fire. Starting in fourth gear with "Whatever You Want," Turner takes a detour through the too-precious "Do What You Do" before time-traveling to the Phil Spector-produced "River Deep Mountain High" (featuring the star singing along with her younger self in a 1960s film clip). "In Your Wildest Dreams" is a lulling bath of sexual longing, and "GoldenEye" is pure, Bond-ian fun. The 21 tracks are heavy with past hits, none of which disappoint: "Proud Mary," "What's Love Got to Do with It." The final performance, "Something Beautiful Remains," is a hard-won epiphany.
By Tom Keogh.
**
01. Whatever You Want
02. Do What You Do
03. River Deep Mountain High
04. Missing You
05. In Your Wildest Dreams
06. Goldeneye
07. Private Dancer
08. We Don't Need Another Hero
09. Let's Stay Together
10. I Can't Stand The Rain
11. Undercover Agent For The Blues
12. Steamy Windows
13. Givin' It Up For Your Love
14. Better Be Good To Me
15. Addicted To Love
16. The Best
17. What's Love Got To Do With It
18. Proud Mary
19. Nutbush City Limits
20. On Silent Wings
21. Something Beautiful Remains (Bonus Track)
**
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Wednesday, December 30, 2009

Art BLAKEY - Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers - Moanin' Live! 1959


Art BLAKEY - Art Blakey & The Jazz Messengers - Moanin' Live! 1959

Jazz

If you simply can only have one Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers disc (and why would you stop there?), it absolutely must be MOANIN'. This 1958 Blue Note date is the cream of the early Messengers' studio sessions. The group of this period featured the wailing Lee Morgan (trumpet), the swinging Benny Golson (sax) and the soulful Bobby Timmons (piano) with longtime bassist Jymie Merritt by Blakey's side. All of the pieces fell into place here to create one of the most hard-swinging, blues-inflected records in jazz history.

Timmons' classic title cut sets the pace as it's laid-back call-and-response chorus and swinging bridge will get in your soul and start your head bobbing. Golson's bouncing "Are You Real" and the subtle "Along Came Betty" feature that golden Messengers ensemble sound that can't be matched as Blakey drives his men mercilessly. The most dynamic tracks, of course, are the drum feature "The Drum Thunder Suite," a Blakey tour-de-force, and the powerful "Blues March" featuring Art's signature shuffle groove. A delightful reading of the standard "Come Rain Or Come Shine" caps it all off. This is the one to get first.
**
A1. Moanin'   9:30
A2. Are You Real?   4:47
A3. Along Came Betty   6:08
B1. The Drum Thunder Suite   7:30
B2. Blues March   6:13
B3. Come Rain or Come Shine   5:45
**
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Benny CARTER with Ben WEBSTERr & Barney BIGARD - BBB & Co 1962


Benny CARTER with Ben WEBSTERr & Barney BIGARD - BBB & Co 1962
Recorded in Englewood Cliffs (New Jersey) on April 10, 1962

Jazz

One of Benny Carter's last jazz recordings before he became totally immersed in writing for the studios, this set matches his alto and trumpet with tenor great Ben Webster, clarinetist Barney Bigard and trumpeter Shorty Sherock on a pair of lengthy blues and Carter's "Lula" and "When Lights Are Low." All of the swing all-stars are in fine form, making one wish that they were not being so neglected by critics and fans alike during this era; Webster soon left the U.S. permanently for Europe. Although not essential, this set is fun.
By Scott Yanow, All Music Guide.
**
This is a great set from 1962 featuring three of the finest jazz soloists of all time: Webster (tenor), Carter (alto), and Bigard (clarinet). The tracks are bluesy: especially fine is the 12min line of "You Can't Tell the Difference [after dark]." Jazz aficianados can't go wrong with this Album; plus, it's a good introduction to cool jazz for novices. Highly recommended.
**
Benny Carter- Alto Sax, Trumpet
Ben Webster- Tenor Sax 
Barney Bigard- Clarinet
Shorty Sherock- Trumpet
Jimmy Rowles- Piano
Dave Barbour- Guitar
Leroy Vinnegar- Bass
Mel Lewis- Drums
**
A1. Opening Blues (Feather) 10:14
A2. Lula (Carter) 7:46
B3. When Lights Are Low (Carter) 4:46
B4. You Can't Tell the Difference When the Sun Goes Down Blues (Feather) 12:07
**
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Danny GATTON - 88 Elmira Street 1990


Danny GATTON - 88 Elmira Street 1990

Blues

This album is nothing short of a complete celebration of the electric guitar. Danny Gatton (1945-1994) was part fierce monster and part teddy bear. His playing style suggests bits of Dick Dale, bits of Chet Atkins, and traces of everything in ...    Full Descriptionbetween. During up-tempo numbers, Gatton could rip the roof off. His ballads and quiet moments never failed to draw tears. 88 ELMIRA ST. marked his debut on a major label after a handful of small-label releases.

The half-dozen originals among 88 ELMIRA ST's eleven tracks are more than simple vehicles for Gatton's soloing. He is ably backed by his regular quartet, and each number shows sharp character and a sense of style. Gatton's rapid-fire runs on such pieces as "Funky Mama" are balanced by the subtler pleasures of his version of The Beach Boys' "In My Room." Sadly, Gatton was even more troubled than Brian Wilson, and the guitarist took his own life four years after the release of this album.
From CD Universe.
**
Danny Gatton- Guitars
Bill Holloman- Sax, Trumpet, Clarinet, Trombone, Hammond B3, Vibes, Piano, Yamaha DX7, Roland D50
Shannon Ford- Drums, Percussion, Hand-D-Gas
John Previti- Upright and Electric Basses
Tommy Lepson- Hammond B3 on "Quiet Village"
**
01. Funky Mama
02. Elmira St. Boogie
03. Blues Newburgh
04. Quiet Village
05. Red Label
06. In My Room
07. Simpsons, The
08. Mutha Ship
09. Pretty Blue
10. Fandingus
11. Slidin' Home
**
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Blindside Blues Band - Blindside Blues Band 1993


Blindside Blues Band - Blindside Blues Band 1993

Blues

“Most blues begin with 'Woke up this mornin'.....' This is to differentiate blues musicians from most other musicians, who sleep past noon."
**
Phenomenal sixth studio disc by the BLINDSIDE BLUES BAND featuring 10 tracks of awesome, over-the-top, solid to the core, killer bluesy heavy guitar riffage that kicks ass and reigns supreme.
**
01. Bad Premonition 
02. Renegade 
03. Hit the Highway 
04. Blues in My Soul 
05. Flying 
06. Back Against the Wall 
07. Powerful Thing 
08. Burning Cities 
09. Early Grave 
10. Winner Takes It All 
**
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Lazy LESTER - Poor Boy Blues 1979


Lazy LESTER - Poor Boy Blues 1979 
FLY LP 544

Blues

After two decades away from the music scene, Lazy Lester has been making up for lost time with a spate of recordings. Why was he away from the music all that time? According to Lazy Lester, he just did not feel like playing. The guitarist turned harmonica player from Baton Rouge, LA, made a name for himself playing with Lightnin' Slim. Lazy Lester called his style of playing swamp blues. It's a lot like the blues of Chicago, but steamier, like the country from where it originates. Leslie Johnson's moniker of Lazy Lester was given to him by record producer Jay Miller, who noted the lackadaisical attitude of the harpist. Lazy Lester, sounding like a meditation master, says that he is never in a hurry because it is easier on the system. But when he plays the harmonica, he sounds anything but laid-back. Since his comeback in 1988, Lester has been fronting his own bands in live concerts and on recordings, and he has proved to be anything but lazy in his recording schedule since his return to performing the blues. His high-energy, soulful harmonica growls out the blues with passion and authority. His recordings All Over You and Blues Stop Knockin' won accolades from the critics. His release Poor Boy Blues may be his best album. Featured are some of the artist's best-known tunes, such as "The Same Thing Could Happen to You" and the title cut, "Poor Boy Blues." He reaches back in time for a reprise of his classic "I Hear You Knockin'." "You Got Me Where You Want Me" drives hard, "Sugar Coated Love" still has its edge, and "Sad Sad City" is the blues personified. Lazy Lester is a living legend. This recording shows why.
By Rose of Sharon Witmer, All Music Guide.
**
A1. Poor Boy Blues
A2. A Woman
A3. The Same Thing
A4. I'm So Glad
A5. Sugar-Coated Love
A6. Patrol Wagon
B1. Sad Sad City
B2. I Hear You Knockin'
B3. Now It's Time
B4. Ain't Nothin' In This World
B5. You Got Me Were You Want Me
B6. You Gonna Lose Your Head
**
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The Graham Bond Organization - Live At Klooks Kleek 1964


The Graham Bond Organization - Live At Klooks Kleek 1964
1997 Reissue GET609

Blues

This nine-track concert gig has appeared in various guises and through various labels (most notoriously Springboard International in the U.S.A. in the late '70s), and it has a dubious reputation on vinyl. In 1988, however, it appeared on CD under this title, and it finally seemed to justify the trouble it took to record. The Graham Bond Organisation's studio recordings were admirable, sometimes impressive, but never essential parts of the British blues boom, leading one to wonder precisely what -- apart from the presence of two future members of Cream -- the group's reputation was based on. The answer is on these sides, recorded by Giorgio Gomelsky "under extreme difficulty." Listening to the band rumble and surge through standards like "Wade In the Water," "Big Boss Man," "Stormy Monday," and "Early In the Morning," it's easy to understand how they got signed and what the record companies were looking for, and also why they didn't get it -- this is gritty stuff, loud R&B with some jazz elements, Dick Heckstall-Smith blowing up a storm on sax, and more than a little stretching out (especially by Baker, whose solos here (check out "Early In the Morning") are more enjoyable than most of what he did with Cream), all of it pretty intense and none of it easy to capture in the studio. The audience and the urgency of concert work were both essential to the group's functioning. On the techincal side, there's some distortion, even some overload, and Jack Bruce's bass isn't captured in its more resonant form (and what electric bass on any live recording before about 1968 ever was?), but the electricity is here, along with the immediacy, and this CD may be the way to best appreciate this band.
By Bruce Eder, All Music Guide.
**
The most dirty , evil sounding R'n'B ever committed to vinyl.
Graham Bond Organization - the band everyone wanted to sound like, but no-one wanted to look like. This is the business. forget the studio albums, produced in a sterile 60s studio environment. If you liked John Mayall's 'Diary of a Band', you'll love this. Raw, pumping sweating, screeching, banging throbbing rhythm and blues at its very best - live. The record version is very poor quality, I haven't heard the cd - it may be better or worse - who cares ? Turn up the volume and get down baby. You know you want it.
By Dave Goodenough.
**
Graham Bond- (Sax, Organ),
Jack Bruce- (Bass), (Harmonica), (Vocals),
Ginger Baker- (Drums).
**
A1. Wade In The Water   2:45
A2. Big Boss Man   5:20
A3. Early In The Morning   4:16
A4. Person To Person Blues   5:14
A5. Spanish Blues   3:01
B1. Introduction By Dick Jordan   2:05
B2. The First Time I Met The Blues   5:11
B3. Stormy Monday   4:14
B4. Train Time   4:17
B5. What'd I Say   5:26
**
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Canned HEAT - Internal Combustion 1994


Canned HEAT - Internal Combustion 1994

Blues

The living members of Canned Heat got together with fellow musicians and laid it down in keeping with the tradition and concept that Bob Hite and Allan Wilson envisioned when they first founded Canned Heat. Originally released in 1994 it has 11 tracks including, 'Nothing At All', '24 Hours', 'I Used To Be Bad' and 'John Lee Hooker Boogie'.
**
With so many boogie blues/rock bands around these days it's important to remember that Canned Heat just about invented the form. A solid outing.
From Living Blues.
**
Canned Heat:
James Thornbury- (Vocals, Harmonica, Guitar);
Henry "The Sunflower" Vestine, Junior Watson- (Guitar);
Ron Shumake- (Acoustic & Electric Bass);
Adolfo "Fito" De La Parra- (Drums, Vocals).
Additional personnel:
Ruby Valdez- (Vocals);
Harvey Mandel- (Guitar);
Ira Ingber- (Guitar, Percussion);
Bill Bergman- (Tenor Sax);
Stephen Kupka- (Baritone Sax);
Daniel Fornero- (Trumpet);
Nick Lane- (Trombone);
Ronnie Barron- (Piano);
Larry "The Mole" Taylor, Carl Sealove- (Electric Bass);
R.J. Rose, Giovanni Arreola- (Background Vocals).
**
01. Used To Be Bad 03:25
02. John Lee Hooker Boogie 04:20
03. Remember Woodstock 05:26
04. (You'll Have To) Come And Get It 03:56
05. The Heat In Me Is Up 05:02
06. It's Hot 03:56
07. Vision Of You 05:09
08. Nothing At All 04:32
09. 24 Hours 04:04
10. Gamblin' Woman 03:15
11. I Might Be Tempted 04:23
**
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Blues Addicts - Blues Addicts 1970


Blues Addicts - Blues Addicts 1970
SL 1015

Blues

Their style varies a bit between (mostly) hard and (a bit) calmer blues-rock influenced from the start by John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers but also by Cream and Hendrix, from which the acid solos have had their share of inspirations, even though the band crosses a freaking out line a couple times a bit heavier than that. After some good tracks, after the 4th, acid psych-bluesrock track, “Hailow”, the group suddenly bursts out of its borders, with heavy fuzz solos and sonically loaded bass, stoned in its nature. One band member at some point can’t help singing along on the heavy electric guitar solos. “Simple” is most clearly influenced by Hendrix. “Coward Way”, also a great track, is more classic bluesrock with heavy electric guitar, and additional congas to the percussion. “Smukke” is one of the two slower rhythmical tracks, and is sung with sad emotional strength. The last track, “electric” has at some point two extremely heavy electric guitar solos on top of each other, combined with some singing, a raw acid garage sound of drums, and a repeating but still pulling rhythmical electric bass. At some point the guitar rambles like a machine gun, before one last heavy outro solo, leaving the listener somewhat impressed.
**
The sole album released by a journeyman blues-rock band from Denmark in 1970, Blues Addicts is one of those records that gets its reputation for being so obscure rather than being a lost classic, frankly speaking. But as with everything, there's always a context for some sort of reissue somewhere, and its revival on the Shadoks label in 2008 reveals it to be enthusiastic and not entirely without interest, but there's not much else to say otherwise. Backing vocalist and guitarist Ivan Horn provides liner note details from an interview in 2002 about the band's history and the circumstances surrounding the recording -- it's a brief but enjoyable tale of how a bunch of young enthusiasts took to the then-new sounds of acts like Cream and the Jimi Hendrix Experience with enthusiasm -- while the fact that the group concentrated on originals rather than cover versions is definitely to their credit. (A sense of humor didn't hurt them at all: the opening track's title is a mathematical formula, for example, while "Bottleneck" is aptly and accurately named, as one can audibly hear.) Horn's guitar work has definite moments to it, such as the breaks on "Ba-Ba-Dar," while lead singer and conga player Thorstein "Gibber" Thomsen is competent enough, as is the group's rhythm section. But the hastily recorded album sounds unavoidably muffled in its re-release -- the original master tapes were lost in a fire soon after it was recorded -- and overall the disc bears the signs of its quick creation. It's an artifact that will please the obscurity seekers, but people fine with things like the previously named artists, as well as acts like Peter Green's Fleetwood Mac, won't need to add it to their collections per se.
By Ned Raggett.
**
Ivan Horn- (Guitar, Vocals),
Gibber Thomsen- (Vocals, cCongas),
Mich Brink- (Bass),
Henning Aasbjerg- (Drums).
**
A1. 5/4  
A2. Ba-Ba-Dar  
A3. Bottleneck  
A4. Hailow  
B1. Jazzer - Simple Expression  
B2. Coward Way  
B3. Smukke  
B4. Electric
**
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Albert COLLINS - Truckin' With Albert Collins 1969


Albert COLLINS - Truckin' With Albert Collins 1969

Blues

This set of early sessions shows the style of this blues-guitar behemoth already clearly defined. Collins plays in minor tuning and plucks the strings aggressively with his right hand, giving his playing--even at this stage--an utterly distinctive sound. The set list features Collins's original, groove-inflected instrumentals (he turns in one vocal performance on "Dyin' Flu"), with tenor sax, alto sax, and trumpet adding punchy lines and jazzy solos over comping from a tight bass-drums-and-organ rhythm section.

The centerpiece here, naturally, is Collins's guitar work. His sharp, carefully crafted leads are impressive throughout--he uses space to excellent effect, and he values interplay with the rhythm section over standard flashy showboating. TRUCKIN' contains many of Collins's best-known tunes, including "Frostbite" and "Frosty." (Reputedly, both Johnny Winter and Janis Joplin--teenagers at the time--were present in the studio when Collins cut "Frosty." Joplin predicted the song would be a hit. She was right--it sold millions, and became one of Collins's signature songs). For essential early offerings from this blues master, TRUCKIN' WITH ALBERT COLLINS is at the top of the list.

Principally recorded in Houston, Texas from 1962 to 1963. Originally released in 1965 as "THE COOL SOUND OF ALBERT COLLINS" (TCF-8002).
**
If you think of Albert Collins was just another axe-wielding Alligator Records blues genericist, this album is a key part of the antidote to that misconception. Originally recorded in 1965 — when Collins was fresh off a day job washing dishes at a River Oaks soda fountain -- for Bill Hall's TCF Hall label in Beaumont, this collection was re-released after Collins's rediscovery in 1969 by Canned Heat's Bob Hite. Truckin' finds Collins doing just that through ten instrumentals and one slow blues vocal. Most of the tunes here have "cool" titles and they all live up that description. There's "Frosty" and "Don't Lose Your Cool," both of the show-stopping shuffles he played right up to the end of his days, but there's also so much more here.
Back in the mid-60s, black musicians were still crafting their records for a black audience. The so-called blues boom had yet to occur; the white blues purists had yet to start sorting out who was "authentic" from those they thought weren't in accord with the Robert Johnson myth. Blues musicians like Collins were still evolving to try and keep up with black musical taste, which might then have been in a greater state of flux than it is now.
Gutbucket blues with long guitar-god shredding solos of the sort Collins would revisit on his '70s and '80s Alligator releases were resolutely out of style. In style were the funky groove-jazz nocturnes of organists like Jimmy Smith, whose shadow hangs heavy over this album, in both the funky Rhodes organ of Walter McNeill and the piercing sax leads of Henry Hayes, both of which are played off of Collins's trademark stinging,
jagged Telecaster.
And perhaps "groove blues" might be the best two-word descriptor for this album, though it also features forays into surf ("Kool Aide"), the spacey, spare jazz of "Thaw Out," whacky rumba ("Frostbite"), and the mariachi-tinged "Icy Blue," the perfect song to accompany margaritas at Third Ward's Spanish Village restaurant. (There's also "Snow-Cone II," which is every bit the equal of "Frosty" and "Don't Lose Your Cool" in the funky-butt shuffle department.) As with jazz tunes, most songs feature the three lead instruments trading off solos, but the tunes are short as blues singles of the era — most clock in at under three minutes.
Truckin' With Albert Collins is the perfect album for truckin' around Houston, preferably late at night, in a Cadillac convertible with the top down in the funky part of town.
By John Nova Lomax.
**
Albert Collins- (Vocals, Guitar);
Henry Hayes- (Alto Sax);
Big Tiny- (Tenor Sax);
Frank Mitchell- (Trumpet);
Walter McNeil- (Organ);
Herbert Henderson- (Drums).
**
A1. Frosty   3:05
A2. Hot 'N Cold   3:07
A3. Frostbite   2:08
A4. Tremble   2:44
A5. Thaw Out   2:41
A6. Dyin' Flu   3:17
B1. Don't Lose Your Cool   2:17
B2. Backstroke   2:51
B3. Kool Aide   2:47
B4. Shiver 'N Shake   2:14
B5. Icy Blue   3:02
B6. Snow-Cone II   2:35
**
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Keith JARRET - Fort Yawuh 1973


Keith JARRET - Fort Yawuh 1973
AS-9240

Jazz

This was Jarrett's first album for Impulse and the first with producer Ed Michel. (The record company would replace Michel with Edmond Edwards about three years later, prompting Jarrett to abandon Impulse and record exclusively for ECM.) Although this basic group had recorded several previous albums for Atlantic and Columbia, this was it's first live recording and the first to fully display the improvisational gifts of all the band members. This reissue is expanded and remixed. The first track, (If the) Misfits (Wear it) is an example of this band's fireworks. The opening pounding rhythms on the piano set up a feeling of tension. The statement of the melody sets up a great piano solo, followed by a tenor sax solo by Dewey Redman. This unedited version lengthens his solo by a couple of minutes and it's worth every second. The title song is next. Fort Yawuh is an anagram for Fourth Way, a concept Jarrett had run across in the writings of G I. Gurdjieff. Dewey Redman's solo on musette was overpowering on the original release and it is expanded here. The major addition to this track compared to the original lp is a lengthy, mysterious-sounding introduction, wherein Jarrett strums the piano strings. De Drums and Still Life, Still Life are presented just as they were in 1973. The first is a rhythmic workout for the whole band. (My best friend in grad school used to say that the introduction sounded like Proud Mary!) The second is one of Jarrett's most beautiful ballads. Oddly, this reissue still cuts off the tune in the middle of Charlie Haden's bass solo. The final track, Roads Travelled, Roads Veiled, Had first appeared on an Impulse live sampler in an excerpt about five minutes long. The entire 20 minute performance is here and it is magnificent. It includes Jarrett's finest recorded soprano sax solo. His technique is primitive compared to Dewey Redman (or even his son, Joshua), but its filled with soul and emotion. Special mention should be made of Paul Motian's drumming. His style and sound are unique in jazz, particularly his use of the tom-toms. This highly improvisational band was the perfect setting for his innovations to flower. Though some fans and critics prefer the so-called "Belonging" quartet, for my money this band was the more exciting and imaginative unit. This new edition of one of their finest albums is long overdue. However, it is a shame that there are no liner notes. All the musicians involved are still active and I find it hard to believe none of them could be persuaded to provide some comments on the music or background to the concerts at the Village Vanguard where it was recorded.
By Dan Cunningham.
**
On Fort Yawuh, Keith Jarrett is joined by Dewey Redman (tenor sax), Charlie Haden (bass), Paul Motian (drums), and Danny Johnson (percussion) to produce this set recorded live at the legendary Village Vanguard in New York City on February 24, 1973. About two minutes into "Fort Yawuh," Jarrett prepares the listener for a piano solo by announcing himself with quick and sharp keyboard jabs that evolve into spared and beautiful crescendos that before too long involve the soulful wails of Redman on the sax. The following song, "De Drums," is the one track that really swings on this album. Another long one, at 12 minutes in length, "De Drums" is much more focused on a steady and consistent rhythm that is established immediately by a smooth five-note bassline accented by the piano and shakers. Although describable as smooth and cool, this song has a palpable energy perhaps due to the construction of the bassline whose pauses give an enjoyable sense of suspense. A little more than five minutes into this song there is a thematic shift that speeds up the tempo and makes this title swing even more while involving Redman's sax and Motian's drum kit. Half past the eight-minute mark the tempo settles back down to its original drawl, and the song finishes with a lazy bop that makes this the standout track on the album. Fans of Jarrett's avant-garde liberalism will find "De Drums" to be the track most unlike the other four selections on this album. "Still Life, Still Life" is more like a ballad in that it's very slow, but it still maintains the structural freedom featured in the "Fort Yawuh," "(If the) Mysfits (Wear It)," and "Roads Traveled, Roads Veiled."
By Qa'id Jacobs.
**
Keith Jarrett- Piano, Percussion; Soprano Sax
Dewey Redman- Tenor Sax, Percussion; Chinese Musette, Clarinet
Charlie Haden- Bass
Paul Motian- Drums, Percussion
Danny Johnson- Percussion
**
A1. (If The) Misfits (Wear It)  13:10
A2. Fort Yawuh  10:55
B1. De Drums  11:57
B2. Still Life, Still Life  8:41
**
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Khan JAMAL Quartet - Dark Warrior 1984


Khan JAMAL Quartet - Dark Warrior 1984
1995 Issue

Jazz

One of the best of vibraphonist Khan Jamal's SteepleChase albums, this set matches Jamal with the great Charles Tyler (doubling on alto and baritone), the always lyrical bassist Johnny Dyani, and drummer Leroy Lowe. Together they interpret six of Jamal's originals (plus Tyler's "Space Traveller," which was dedicated to Sun Ra), performing colorful inside/outside music full of surprises and variety. ”
Scott Yanow, All Music Guide.
**
Khan Jamal- Vibes
Charles Tyler- Alto & Bariton Sax
Johnny Dyani- Bass
Leroy Lowe- Drums
**
01. Johnny's In Malmo 07:42
02. Just Us 07:47
03. Principal 07:20
04. Whisper Sweet 06:33
05. Dark Warrior 06:28
06. Hucksterman 06:45
07. Space Traveller 05:17
08. Hucksterman take 2 09:21 [#]
**
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Oscar PETERSON Trio - Tristeza On Piano 1970


Oscar PETERSON Trio - Tristeza On Piano 1970
MPS 15275

Jazz

This is a fabulous album by Oscar Peterson at the very height of his powers. Recorded in 1970 or 1971 by Hans Georg Brunner-Schwer (who did 'Tracks' the same year), with Sam Brown on Bass and Bobby Durham on Drums.

The first track 'Tristeza' is really scary. Taken at a frightening tempo Oscar just wastes the keyboard. You might expect this as that is what Oscar Peterson does! However track 2 is demonstration of one of his other talents. 'Nightingale' is one of his own compositions (the only one on this album) and its another excellent track. The remaining tracks are all standards of one form or another, with perhaps my favourite being 'down here on the ground'. This is a slower tempo soulful tune, which contains one of Oscar's trademark rolling crescendos (as on Hymn to Freedom). Oh boy is this man good on the Piano!

This album is from an era when Peterson only made really good albums, and whilst this perhaps isn't as essential as 'Tracks', 'The Trio' or 'La Salle Pleyel'
By S.J.Buck.
**
Oscar Peterson- (Piano);
Sam Jones- (Bass);
Bobby Durham- (Drums).
**
A1. Tristeza   3:13
A2. Nightingale   6:42
A3. Porgy   6:12
A4. Triste   5:21
B1. You Stepped Out of a Dream   3:31
B2. Watch What Happens   6:10
B3. Down Here on the Ground   8:46
B4. Fly Me to the Moon   4:38
**
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Tuesday, December 29, 2009

Johnny GRIFFIN - Griff'n'Bags 1967-1969


Johnny GRIFFIN - Griff'n'Bags 1967-1969
1997 Issue RW103LP

Jazz

Well, not quite. Chicago tenor great Johnny ("Griff") Griffin is heard on five tunes and Milt ("Bags") Jackson, whose intention was to reunite with fellow MJQ founder Kenny Clarke for a Clarke-Boland Big Band project that never materialized, is heard on five different tunes.
Despite slightly inaccurate labeling and packaging that doesn't explain itself until you open it, Griff 'n' Bags is an excellent collection of four Francy Boland-Jimmy Woode-Kenny Clarke sessions recorded between 1967 and 1969. The 16 pieces enclosed here seem to have been recorded when all the members of the sensational, underrated C-BBB were unable to assemble in full.

The first three titles, from 1967 (Woode's "Gamal Sady'n'Em" and "Gyson's Bag" and Neal Hefti's "Lonely Girl"), focus the diverse and interesting rhythmic moxy on what made the C-BBB's engine run so swiftly and smoothly - the trio of Boland, Woode and Clarke. Three horns are added for sessions a year and a half later yielding three superb numbers with standouts including Boland's wondrously Latinesque "The Turk's Bolero," a feature for Sahib Shihab, and the swinging "Muvaffak's Pad" spotlighting the ever-amazing Boland's piano and the graceful trumpet of Idrees Sulieman. Bags's 1969 pieces are highlighted by his own typically-soulful "Blues For K" and his vocal (no vibes) on "I'm A Fool To Want You." Griffin, a charter C-BBB member, is brought forward on his 1968 pieces and swings hard and happily on five titles, and in tip-top form on the New Orleans drawl of "Foot Patting" and the Nat Adderley like "Deep Eight."

The Italian Rearward label is now releasing many of producer Gigi Campi's 1960s sessions in attractive packages with boxes, booklets and typically superb notes by Mike Hennessy. These are all worthwhile, often inspired productions well worth investigating. They're also a testament to the beauty and enduring appeal of European stalwarts like pianist, composer and arranger Francy Boland and American expatriates Sahib Shihab, Idrees Sulieman, Benny Bailey and Johnny Griffin. Despite the slightly misleading packaging here, Griff 'n' Bags is also excellent and highly recommended.
By Douglas Payne. AAJ.
**
Jimmy Woode Jr.- Bass
Kenny Clare- Drums (tracks: C3 to D1, D3, D4) , Kenny Clarke
Francy Boland- Piano 
Sahib Shihab- Baritone Sax, Flute (tracks: A3, A4, B1, B3 to D4)
Johnny Griffin- Tenor Sax
Ake Persson- Trombone (tracks: A3, B1, C2 to D1, D3, D4)
Idrees Sulieman- Trumpet (tracks: A3, B1, C2)
Benny Bailey- Trumpet, Flugelhorn (tracks: C3 to D1, D3, D4)
Milt Jackson- Vibraphone (tracks: A4, B3, B4, C1, D2)
**
A1. Gamal Sady'n'Em 4:59
A2. Gyson's Bag 4:58
A3. The Girl And The Turk 4:03
A4. Just Friends 4:14
B1. Muvaffak's Pad 6:19
B2. Lonely Girl 2:48
B3. I'm A Fool To Want You 4:23
B4. Blues For K. 4:59
C1. Like Someone In Love 4:23
C2. The Turk's Bolero 2:49
C3. Foot Patting 6:14
C4. Please Send Me Someone To Love 5:27
D1. Deep Eight 5:22
D2. Just You, Just Me 2:36
D3. The JAMF's Are Coming 6:44
D4. Lady Heavy Bottom's Waltz 4:58
**
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Sonny CLARK - Cool Struttin' 1958


Sonny CLARK - Cool Struttin' 1958
2005 Issue BN-1588

Jazz

Sonny Clark's classic COOL STRUTTIN' is a session that epitomizes the Blue Note golden era. A celebrated cast that includes Clark, Art Farmer, Jackie McLean, Paul Chambers, and Philly Joe Jones in their prime swings and struts its way through Clark's originals and some choice standards.

Bluesy swingers like Clark's smoky title cut and scorching burners like Miles Davis's "Sippin' at Bells" offer swinging grooves at opposing extremes that serve as vehicles for stellar solo spots by all. Intricate tunes like Clark's energetic "Blue Minor" and a blistering read of Rodgers and Hart's "Lover" are held in tight check by the consummate rhythm team of Chambers and Jones. The tracks also provide excellent breathing room for Farmer, McLean, and Clark to strut their stuff. The lone trio cut is the swinging "Deep Night," which showcases Clark's sharp technique and tasteful touch. In all, this is an essential disc for connoisseurs of the classic hard-bop period, a period that continues to inspire future generations.

Recorded in 1958, this legendary date with the still-undersung Sonny Clark in the leader's chair also featured a young Jackie McLean on alto (playing with a smoother tone than he had before or ever did again), trumpeter Art Farmer, and the legendary rhythm section of bassist Paul Chambers and drummer Philly Joe Jones, both from the Miles Davis band. The set begins with one of the preeminent "swinging medium blues" pieces in jazz history: the title track with its leveraged fours and eights shoved smoothly up against the walking bass of Chambers and the backbeat shuffle of Jones. Clark's solo, with its grouped fifths and sevenths, is a wonder of both understatement and groove, while Chambers' arco solo turns the blues in on itself. While there isn't a weak note on this record, there are some other tracks that stand out, most notably Miles' "Sippin' at Bells," with its loping Latin rhythm. When McLean takes his solo against a handful of Clark's shaded minor chords, he sounds as if he may blow it -- he comes out a little quick -- but he recovers nicely and reaches for a handful of Broadway show tunes to counter the minor mood of the piece. He shifts to both Ben Webster and Lester Young before moving through Bird, and finally to McLean himself, riding the margin of the changes to slip just outside enough to add some depth in the middle register. The LP closes with Henderson and Vallée's "Deep Night," the only number in the batch not rooted in the blues. It's a classic hard bop jamming tune and features wonderful solos by Farmer, who plays weird flatted notes all over the horn against the changes, and McLean, who thinks he's playing a kind of snake charmer blues in swing tune. This set deserves its reputation for its soul appeal alone.
By Thom Jurek. AMG.
**
Sonny Clark- Piano 
Paul Chambers- Bass 
Jackie McLean- Alto Sax
Art Farmer- Trumpet 
"Philly" Joe Jones- Drums
**
A1. Cool Struttin'   9:24
A2. Blue Minor   10:19
B1. Sippin' at Bells   8:19
B2. Deep Night   9:34
**
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Sahib SHIHAB And The Danish Radio Jazz Group 1965


Sahib SHIHAB And The Danish Radio Jazz Group 1965
All Credits Go To *Paul F.*

Jazz

Another real rarity from Sahib Shihab recorded in Copenhagen where he had been a member of the Danish Radio Group since 1962.As an original pressing this is probably the rarest of all his albums and usually needs a re-mortgage to buy!
It was re-issued in 2001 (perfectly re-packaged and pressed by Octav-even down to the flip back cover)from which I have ripped this share.This has since dissapeared -(I think I read that there were only a few hundred copies pressed?) but comes up on Ebay from time to time.It has also just made a cd issue in Japan.
All the tunes were penned by Shihab during his extended stay in Copenhagen from 1962 and finally put on vinyl during two sessions in August 1965.THere are some big names here in the early stages of their careers-Niels Henning Orsted Pederson,Alan Botschinsky,Palle Mikkelborg and Bent Axen .Rather than waffle on about the music I think its easier just to say if you enjoyed the previous posts then you cannot go wrong with this-it's just superb throughout!
**
Sahib Shihab (1925-1989) played alongside such greats as Thelonious Monk, Dizzy Gillespie, Tadd Dameron, and Art Blakey in the 1940s and 50s. But in order to escape the racial problems in the United States and take advantage of the increased appreciation and opportunities for jazz abroad, he left for Europe and settled in Copenhagen in 1962. He became one of the featured soloists in the Clarke-Boland Big Band and joined the relatively young Danish Radio Jazz Group around the same time. This group, which boasted future international jazz icons Palle Mikkelborg and Niels Henning Orsted Pedersen, gave Shihab a rare outlet to present his own compositions.

This outstanding recording presents Sahib Shihab in exceptionally fine form, presiding over two sessions recorded in August 1965. Unlike most American jazz recordings of the time, there are no concessions to popular fads, rock and roll, or movie themes. All nine tracks here are Shihab originals that mix his post-bop leanings with intriguing modal experiments. Shihab sticks to baritone sax for most of the 37-minute program (except "Harvey's Tune," which prefigures the C-BBB version of Burt Bacharach's "Wives And Lovers" and the brilliantly playful "The Crosseyed Cat"), but he hardly ever dominates. He is the most democratic of leaders, letting the orchestra set the agenda and allowing ample solo space to his talented stablemates.

Shihab's interesting and too-little known compositions make this disc the pleasure that it is. All start with something attention grabbing, then proceed to swing and challenge in equal measure, never moving toward a predictable destination. The opening "Di-Da," titled for the melody's staccato cadence, has a sinewy, finger-snapping crime-jazz groove. This, "Not Yet," and "The Crosseyed Cat" are the disc's best, most captivating tunes. All three deserve to be much better known. "Dance of the Fakowees," named for an Indian tribe, and "Mai Ding," named for the Japanese poet, suggest Shihab was listening closely to Sun Ra's Arkestra, but "Mai Ding" also hints that Shihab understood the R&B appeal of both Quincy Jones and Oliver Nelson's work.

"Dance Of The Fakowees" and "Harvey's Tune" offer something of a tribute to the vastly underrated Francy Boland, whose musical stewardship benefited Shihab throughout much of the 1960s. Shihab himself is featured on baritone sax for the pretty "What's New"-like "No Time For Cries," and his arranging skills are prominently front-lined on the "Django"-like "Tenth Lament," which seemingly suggests Bill Holman's structures for Stan Kenton.

With so few examples of Shihab's magnificent artistry outside of the Clarke-Boland Big Band available, Sahib Shihab and the Danish Radio Jazz Group is a rare opportunity to hear the great baritone saxist and dynamic flautist doing what he does best in what is ultimately a complimentary and wondrous setting.
By Douglas Payne. AAJ.
**
Sahib Shihab- Baritone Sax, Flute, Cowbell, Vocal (9);
Palle Bolvig, Palle Mikkelborg, Allan Botschinsky- Trumpet and Flugelhorn;
Torolf Molgard- Tuba, Eufonium;
Svend Age Nielsen- Trombone, Bass Trombone;
Poul Kjaeldgard- Tuba, Trombone, Bass Trombone;
Poul Hindberg- Alto Sax, Clarinet;
Bent Jaedig- Tenor Sax, Flute, clarinet;
Niels Husum- Tenor Sax, Soprano Sax, Bass clarinet;
Bent Nielsen- Baritone Sax, Flute, clarinet;
Ib Renard- Baritone Sax;
Louis Hjulmand- Vibes;
Fritz Von Bulow- Guitar;
Bent Axen- Piano;
Niels Henning Orsted Pedersen- Bass;
Alex Riel- Drums.
**
01.Di-Da 5:10
02.Dance Of The Fakowees 4:12
03.Not Yet 3:27
04.Tenth Lament 6:23
05.Mai Ding 4:47
06.Harvey's Tune 3:11
07.No Time For Cries 3:53
08.The Crosseyed Cat 3:38
**
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Anouar BRAHEM - Vague 2003


Anouar BRAHEM - Vague 2003

Jazz

After some remarkable albums, including Le Pas du Chat Noir, the incredible tale of love or Barzakh, it was natural that the German label ECM, who has attended the International Recognition of the oud player Anouar Brahem, devotes a compilation, gathering and some of his most beautiful melodies.In addition some of his most famous moreaux, including "Astrakhan cafe" or "E la nave va" Wave brings a bevy of outstanding musicians.  Among those who are more than coaches, we will simply quote John Surman, Jan Garbarek and Richard Galliano.
By Hervé Comte.
**
Anouar Brahem- Oud
Jan Garbarek- Saxophones
John Surman- Saxophones
Dave Holland- Bass
Palle Danielsson- Bass
Jon Christensen- Drums
**
01. Ronda    03:17
02. Parfum de gitane    04:21
03. Houdouth    05:38
04. Le chien sur les genoux de la devineresse    03:45
05. Sebika    05:34
06. Leila au pays du Caroussel, Variation    05:41
07. Diversion    05:39
08. Comme une absence    03:17
09. Nihawend Lunga    03:34
10. Claquent les voiles    02:08
11. E La Nave Va    04:43
12. Vague    02:39
13. Bou Naouara    02:25
14. Mazad    05:06
15. Hulmu Rabia    02:19
16. Astrakan Café    04:44
17. La nuit des yeux    05:29
**
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Albert COLLINS - There's Gotta Be a Change 1971


Albert COLLINS - There's Gotta Be a Change 1971
TWS 103

Blues

Although this probably isn't Albert Collins' best album, it is significant for several reasons. Producer Bill Szymczyk, who had great commercial success with B.b. King on Indianola Mississippi Seeds obviously hoped to duplicate that for his own Tumbleweed label. To that end, an all-star assemblage of players were present for these sessions at the famed Record Plant West in Los Angeles. Highlights include a slashing guitar duel between Collins and Jessie Ed Davis.
By William Ashford, All Music Guide.
**
"The Albert Collins LP is a solid blues album, but far from his best LPs, probably because the production includes too many guests (Dr John, various horn players) and features mostly white session men/musicians: Jim Keltner, Jesse Ed Davis, Brian Garofalo... Good L.A musicians but not bluesmen! Only 9 tracks, with great blues ("There's got to be a change") but also a dispensable novelty blues called "Frog jumpin". Once again, amazing packaging with gatefold and giant poster."
By Stephane Rebeschini.
**
Bud Brisbois- Trumpet
Pete Candoli- Trumpet
Albert Collins- Guitar, Vocals
James Dallam- Piano, Keyboards
Larry Daniels- Drums 
Bryan Garofalo- Bass
Jimmie Haskell- Arranger, Horn
Jim Horn- Saxophone
Plas Johnson- Saxophone
Jim Keltner- Drums 
Bobby Knight- Trombone
Richard Landis- Piano
Lew McCreary- Trombone
Jay Migliori- Saxophone
Bill Perkins- Saxophone
Mac Rebennack(Dr. John)- Piano
Judy Roderick- Vocals
Michael Rosso- Bass, Drums 
Ernie Watts- Saxophone
Brent Williamson- Vocals
Joe Zagarino- Piano, Keyboards
Bill Szymczyk- Vocals
**
01. There's Gotta Be a Change 
02. In Love Wit'cha  
03. Stickin'  
04. Today Ain't Like Yesterday
05. Somethin' on My Mind
06. Frog Jumpin'
07. I Got a Mind to Travel
08. Get Your Business Straight
09. Fade Away
**
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Monday, December 28, 2009

Yusef LATEEF - Plays for Lovers 1957


Yusef LATEEF - Plays for Lovers 1957
1966 PRT 7447

Jazz

Wilbur Harden- Flugelhorn, Balloon
Yusef Lateef- Flute, Sax (Tenor), Oboe, Multi Instruments, Main Performer
Ernie Farrow- Bass, Rabat
Oliver Jackson- Drums, Gong
Hugh Lawson- Piano
**
A1. If You Could See Me Now 
A2. Love Theme From "The Robe" 
A3. All Alone 
A4. Sea Breeze 
A5. Yesterdays 
B1. When You're Smiling 
B2. Meditation 
B3. You've Changed 
B4. Love Theme From "Spartacus"
**
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Sun RA - Sun Song 1956


Sun RA - Sun Song 1956
1967 Lp Issue DS-411

Jazz


The late pianist/bandleader/composer Sun Ra was one of the earliest musicians to embrace the jazz avant-garde, and some credit him as being a point of origin for it. Be that it may, SUN SONG is one of the Ra's earliest and most accessible albums. Recorded in the mid-1950s and consisting mostly of Ra originals, SUN features a combination of Monk-like minimalism, pretty melodies, unusual harmonies and rhythms, and concise soloing. Not nearly as free-sounding as his post-1960 recordings, SUN SONG is highly recommended to those new to Sun Ra and even to modern/progressive jazz.

Originally issued as Jazz By Sun Ra in 1956, Sun Song was the first long-player to feature the enigmatic bandleader. However, his various bands -- or "Arkestras" as Ra proclaimed them -- had been issuing 78 and 45 rpms since the mid '50s. This recording initiated a much larger audience to the multifarious and otherwise logical post-bop rhythms of one of jazz's most notorious and equally respected figures. The sides which comprise Sun Song were recorded on July 12, 1956 by Tom Wilson, who would go on to produce such rock luminaries as Frank Zappa, Simon and Garfunkel, Bob Dylan, and the Velvet Underground, among others. Wilson's use of Chicago's premier Universal Recording Studio accounts for the amazing crispness and attention to nuance omnipresent throughout the disc. Ra's highly arithmetical approach to bop was initially discounted by noted jazz critic Nat Hentoff as "repetitious" with phrases which were "built merely on riffs with little development." In retrospect, however, it is obvious there is much more going on here. Among the musical innovations woven into compositions, such as the up-tempo "Brainville" and "Transition," are advanced time signatures coupled with harmonic scales based on Ra's mathematical equations. The intricate harmonies and complicated arrangements on "Possession" and "Sun Song" are inspiring in their deceptive simplicity. Text originally featured in a booklet accompanying Jazz By Sun Ra is reproduced in the CD liner notes booklet. This is noteworthy as one of the rare occasions upon which he sought to explain not only his influences, but his methods of composition and modes of execution as well. This may well be the most accessible work in Sun Ra's massive catalogue. It is likewise one of the most beautiful.
By Lindsay Planer.
**
Sun Ra- (Piano, Electric Piano, Organ);
James Scales- (Alto Sax);
John Gilmore- (Tenor Sax, Percussion);
Pat Patrick- (Baritone Sax, Bells);
David Young, Arthur Hoyle- (Trumpet, Bells)
Julian Priester- (Trombone, Chimes);
Wilburn Green- (Electric Bass, Bass Guitar, Tambourine);
Robert Barry- (Drums, Bells);
Richard Evans- (Drums);
James Herndon- (Timbales, Timpani, Bells);
Jim Herndon- (Timpani, Percussion).
**
A1. Brainville   4:29
A2. Call for All Demons   4:30
A3. Transition   3:40
A4. Possession   5:00
A5. Street Named Hell   3:55
B1. Lullaby for Realville   4:40
B2. Future   3:15
B3. New Horizons   3:05
B4. Fall Off the Log   4:00
B5. Sun Song   3:40
**
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Blue MITCHELL - Graffiti Blues 1973


Blue MITCHELL - Graffiti Blues  1973
MRL 400

Jazz

One of Blue Mitchell's hippest funky sets of the 70s -- an unusual little record that mixes a bit of funky harmonica with his own soulful trumpet! The approach definitely echoes a bit of the "blues" in the title -- but the groove is much more straightforward and funky -- that hard-edged approach that shows up on the best electric Mainstream sessions of the time, with a bad-stepping bottom that moves along nicely throughout! Harmonica's handled by Don Bailey, and other players include Joe Sample on keyboards, Herman Riley on tenor, Freddie Robinson on guitar, and Ray Pounds on drums. Cuts are all nice and long, quite open overall, and almost more relaxed than some of Blue's other Mainstream sessions -- and titles include "Graffiti Blues", "Yeah Ya Right", "Express", "Asso Kam", and "Dorado".
From Dusty Groove.
**
Blue Mitchell- Trumpet
Darrell Clayborn- Fender Bass
Ray Pounds- Drums
Freddie Robinson- Guitar
Don Bailey- Harmonica
Walter Bishop, Jr.- Piano
Joe Sample- Piano, Electric Piano
Herman Riley- Tenor Sax
**
A1. Graffiti Blues  7:16
A2. Yeah Ya Right  5:28
A3. Express  5:05
B1. Asso-Kam  7:23
B2. Dorado   8:58
**
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Melvin TAYLOR - Plays The Blues For You 1984


Melvin TAYLOR - Plays The Blues For You 1984

Blues

Guitarist Melvin Taylor's fluid, smartly constructed solos and understated yet winning vocals are surprises on this 1984 nine-track set recorded for Isabel and recently reissued by Evidence on CD. Taylor is not a fancy or arresting singer but succeeds through his simple, effective delivery of lyrics, slight inflections, and vocal nuances. His guitar work is impressive, with skittering riffs, shifting runs, and dashing solos. Organist/pianist Lucky Peterson is an excellent second soloist, adding cute background phrases at times, then stepping forward and challenging or buttressing Taylor's playing with his own dazzling lines.
By Ron Wynn.
**
Ray Allison- Drums  
Lucky Peterson- Organ, Piano
Melvin Taylor- Guitar, Vocals  
Titus Williams- Bass
**
A1 Talking to Anna-Mae, Part 1   4:10
A2 T.V. Mama   3:15
A3 I'll Play the Blues for You   5:19
A4 Born to Loose   2:58
A5 Tribute to Wes   3:20
B1 Cadillac Assembly Line   5:18
B2 Voodoo Daddy   6:32
B3 Talking to Anna-Mae, Part 2   4:10
B4 Groovin' in Paris   3:15
**
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Raimundo AMADOR - Noche De Flamenco Y Blues 1998


Raimundo AMADOR - Noche De Flamenco Y Blues 1998

Blues

Camarón de la Isla, Paco de Lucia and Raimundo Amador are a must for anyone interested in modern flamenco. The three have introduced many innovations in Flamenco but with quite different approaches.
Raimundo Amador makes a fusion of the happiest side of flamenco with notable blues influences. It's a genre on it's own where Raimundo outstands.
This is a live recording with BB King and other guests.
**
Raimundo Amador, Ricardo Marin, Anye Bao, Tato Icasto, Jose Maya, Amado Zulueta, Carmen Amador, Encarna Amador, Kiko Veneno, Remedios Amaya, Juan Perro, B.B. King, Antonio Carmona, Charo Manzano, Gran Wyoming
**
01. Pa mojar - con El Gran Wyoming  
02. Candela  
03. Pata palo - con Kiko Veneno  
04. Hoy no estoy pa nadie  
05. Ay que gustito pa mis orejas  
06. Blues de la frontera  
07. Camarón - con Remedios Amaya  
08. Tio Diego  
09. Pasa la vida - con Charo Manzano  
10. Amor en vano - con Juan Perro  
11. Bolleré - con B.B. King  
12. Gitano de temporá  
13. Little Wing  
14. Yo me quedo en Sevilla - con Antonio Carmona
**
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McKenna, Mendelson, Mainline - Stink 1969


McKenna, Mendelson, Mainline - Stink 1969
Lbs 83251

Blues

Michael McKenna, previously with Luke & the Apostles and the Ugly Ducklings, formed McKenna Mendelson Mainline with Joe Mendelson (vocals, guitar, bass, harmonica), Tony Nolasco (vocals, drums) and Frank Sheppard (vocals, bass, mandolin, harmonica). After Stink (1968) and Canada, Our Home and Native Land (1971), the band shortened their name to Mainline and broke up soon after. Two posthumous albums appeared in 1972-73: The Mainline Bump and Grind Revue -- Live at the Victory Theatre and Biscuit Meets Mainline. Joe Mendelson's first solo album, Mr. Middle of the Road, appeared in 1972. Michael McKenna and Tony Nolasco later formed Diamondback. A reunion album with McKenna called No Substitute has also been released.
By John Bush, All Music Guide.
**
Joe Mendelson- (Guitar),(Harmonica),(Keyboards),(Vocals),
Mike Harrison- (Bass),
Mike McKenna- (Guitar),
Tony Volasco- (Drums).
**
A1 One Way Ticket   2:58
A2 She's Alright   3:30
A3 Beltmaker   2:45
A4 Mainline   6:52
A5 Think I'm Losing My Marbles   2:23
A6 Drive You   3:17

B1 T.B. Blues   2:09
B2 Better Watch out   4:41
B3 Bad Women   12:30
B4 Don't Give Me No Goose for Christmas Grandma   2:47
**
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Bernard ALLISON – Storm Of Life 2002


Bernard ALLISON – Storm Of Life 2002

Blues

Dynastic bluesman Bernard Allison is a second-generation star now shining in his own right. The guitarist-vocalist son of the late legend Luther Allison paid his early dues leading Koko Taylor's crack Blues Machine band, learned the family business leading his father's electrifying group in Europe, and has now created his own catalog of fine recordings. Storms of Life is the most eclectic and uniformly excellent example yet. After the sizzling solo slide guitar opener "Slip Slidin'," Allison roams wide and free, confidently overlaying his blues personality on material ranging from the reggae-tinged "Just Do Me Any Way You Want" to the R&B title track, which glides over a cushion of keyboards and extra percussion. A bouncy, horn-powered rendition of "Goodbye Little Girl" that recalls Bobby "Blue" Bland provides a fitting conclusion. Allison surprisingly, but effectively, mixes a wide variety of cover material, including everything from ZZ Top's "I Wanna Drive You Home" to Mark Knopfler's "I Think I Love You Too Much" to mentor Johnny Winter's suitably manic "Mean Town Blues." The well-chosen covers, including tunes by Anders Osborne, Leon Russell, and papa Luther, convincingly demonstrate his gifts as an interpreter. By Michael Point.
**
Once in a great while, I hear a new blues release that recalls the depth and energy of the great electric blues players I grew up listening to, players like Waters, Winter, Clapton, Green, Rush, et al. After listening to this CD for almost two years, I've come to the conclusion that it's the best blues release of 2002. It's got everything a great blues album needs. Allison's voice and guitar work are tasty, gritty, and well-seasoned, evidence of the amount of work and dedication he put into his apprenticeships with Koko Taylor and his father. And the song choices are superb. My favorites are "Fistful of Dirt," a killer rock-steady mid-tempo shuffle with a profound message about living through hard times; "Mean Town Blues," which is ample proof that Allison can lay claim to Johnny Winter's Texas electric slide legacy; and "Snake Bit Again," a remarkable vehicle for Allison's gritty, dead-on singing. There's a lot of redundancy in more recent blues releases, but this album shows Allison is capable of being a truly original talent in this often hackneyed genre. Check it out.
By Randy Blythe.
**
Bernard Allison- (Vocals, Guitar);
Paul Diethelm- (Guitar);
Ricky Peterson- (Strings, Piano, Organ);
Richard Rosenblatt- (harmonica);
David Eiland- (Sax);
Larry McCabe- (Trombone);
Brian Simmonds, Jim Kogl- (Tenor Sax);
Bruce McCabe- (Piano);
Ron Sutton, Rob Stupka- (Drums);
Chickie Perez- (Percussion);
Kate Wilson, J.D. Steele, Fred Steele- (Background Vocals).
**
01. Slip Slidin'
02. Storms of Life
03. Down South
04. Just Do Me Any Way You Want
05. I Think I Love You Too Much
06. Mean Town Blues
07. Speed Slide
08. I Wanna Drive You Home
09. Snake Bit Again
10. Reaching Out
11. Fistful of Dirt
12. Help Me Through the Day
13. Goodbye Little Girl
**
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Sunday, December 27, 2009

Pharoah SANDERS - Summun, Bukmun, Umyun (Deaf, Dumb, Blind) 1970


Pharoah SANDERS - Summun, Bukmun, Umyun (Deaf, Dumb, Blind) 1970
AS-9199

Jazz

One of the harder to find ones by Pharoah and a record that features only 2 long songs: the title cut and "Let Us Go Into the House of the Lord", each of which covers a side apiece.

A passionate recording from the greatest disciple of John Coltrane. The two side-long performances of “Summun, Bukmun, Umyon” and “Let Us Go Into The House Of The Lord” stetch and flow forward in spirited abandon. Pharoah’s passion is sustained and heightened by supportive rhythm section comprised of pianist Lonnie Liston Smith, bassist Cecil McBee, drummer Clifford Jarvis, and two percussionists. Sticking strictly to the soprano sax, Pharoah shows little of the cacaphonous ferocity for which he is so well known. Instead, he builds majestically on an intensely hypnotic rhythm that throbs with a strong African vibe. The vastly underrated Woody Shaw adds his shimmering trumpet to this potent mixture. Deaf Dumb Blind brimms with creative energy and drive, and thus makes it the best place to begin for those unacquainted with this living legend of the saxophone.
**
Pharoah Sanders- Soprano Saxophone, Cow Horn, Tritone Whistle, Cowbells, Wood Flute, Thumb Piano, Percussion
Woody Shaw- Trumpet, Yodeling, Percussion
Gary Bartz- Alto Saxophone, Bells, Cowbell, Shakers, Percussion
Lonnie Liston Smith- Piano, Cowbell, Thumb Piano, Percussion
Cecil McBee- Bass
Clifford Jarvis- Drums
Natheniel Bettis- Bylophone, Yodeling, African Percussion
Anthony Wiles- Conga Drum, African Percussion
**
A. Summun Bukmun Umyun 21:17
B. Let Us Go Into The House Of The Lord 18:25
**
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Tsuyoshi Yamamoto Trio - Girl Talk 1975


Tsuyoshi Yamamoto Trio - Girl Talk 1975

Jazz

Previously available as a standard XRCD, this very popular TBM Release has now been remastered for XRCD24! Features: Tsuyoshi Yamamoto on piano, Akira Daiyoshi on bass and Tetsujiro Obara on drums. Includes their special renditions of: “I Love you Porgy,” “Autumn in New York” and of course “Girl Talk.” The soothing sound of this XRCD is a superb example of just how good a Piano-Trio from Japan can sound.
**
Completing a “trilogy” of great records that started with Midnight Sugar and Misty, Girl Talk solidified Tsuyoshi Yamamoto’s reputation as Japan’s premier jazz pianist. Though he would continue to tour and record for Takeshi “Tee” Fujii more than a decade, GIRL TALK became the pinnacle of his career. This trio of classic LPs together are a benchmark in Japanese jazz records in particular and recording engineering in general. As usual, master recordist Yoshihiko Kannari worked with Yamamoto, bassist Akira Daiyoshi and drummer Tetsujiro Onaba at AOI Studios, Tokyo, which featured a tight, nicely baffled room. Kannari’s recordings are prized for their immediacy and dynamic expressiveness, both traits exhibited on Girl Talk to startling effect. Like Midnight Sugar and Misty before it, Kannari’s work on Girl Talk won him the prestigious Swing Journal Critic Poll “Jazz Disc” Engineering award in 1976. It is only natural that Cisco Music include this historic title on its Limited Edition 45-rpm HQ-180 Vinyl.
**
Tsuyoshi Yamamoto- Piano
Isoo Fukui- Bass
Tetsujiro Obara- Drums
**
Lp A
A1. The Way We Were 5:27
A2. Girl Talk 6:13
A3. Gone With the Wind 6:36

Lp B
B1. Take the 'A' Train 5:22
B2. I Love You Porgy 4:51
B3. What Now My Love 5:01
B4. Autumn In New York 4:44
**
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Ron CARTER - All Blues 1974


Ron CARTER - All Blues 1974

Jazz

One of bassist Ron Carter's better albums as a leader, this CTI LP
features a very compact quartet comprised of tenor saxophonist Joe
Henderson, pianist Roland Hanna (keyboardist Richard Tee sits in on
one number), drummer Billy Cobham and Carter. All of the music (even
the ballad "Will You Still Be Mine?") has a blues feeling although
several are not really blues. However, the quality of the solos is
high, and this date lives up to one's expectations.
By Scott Yanow. AMG.
**
Joe Henderson- Tenor Sax
Roland Hanna- Piano
Richard Tee- Peyboard
Ron Carter- Bass, Piccolo Bass
Billy Cobham- Drums
**
A1. A Feeling 3:20 
A2. Light Blue 6:45 
A3. 117 Special 7:05 
       Piano [Electric] - Richard Tee 
B1. Rufus 5:11 
B2. All Blues 9:35 
B3. Will You Still Be Mine 3:58
**
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Sahib SHIHAB - Conversations 1963


Sahib SHIHAB - Conversations 1963

Jazz

An outstanding underrated multi-reed player-composer. Like Tina Brooks, he was a huge talent with great technique and knowledge who didn't get the recognition he deserved even now, 15 years after his death.
This is his best album (hard to find, admittedly) next to his Savoy 1957 albums. The Montmartre location gives the group a very good resonance and Orsted-Pederson bass gives the music the fourth dimension. Sahib means friend in Arabic and you can hear the friendly way the group plays under his guide.
Shihab played with Art Blakey, Dizzy Gillespie and Thelonious Monk and influenced a jazz generation but there isn't much recordings he made as a leader. So I would dare say this album is a very rare gem.
By David E.
**
Because he spent so much of his career living in Europe, Sahib Shihab is primarily known for being a baritonist in the bop era. As this very interesting CD shows, he was also quite original on the alto, soprano and flute and by the early 1960's was open to the influence of the avant-garde without losing his own musical personality. Shihab, who is teamed on this live Copenhagen session with flugelhornist Allan Botchinsky, guitarist Ole Molin, drummer Alex Riel and the 17-year old bassist Niels Henning Orsted Pedersen, performs "Someday My Prince Will Come," "Charade" and a lengthy version of "Billy Boy" along with five originals including the three-part "Conversations." This surprising music is well worth several listens and shows that Shihab was a much more diverse player than is usually thought.
By Scott Yanow, All Music Guide. 
**
Sahib Shihab- Alto, baritone, soprano saxophones, flute
Allan Botchinsky- Flugelhorn
Ole Molin- Guitar
Niels Henning Øersted Pedersen- Bass
Axel Riel- Drums
Bjarne Rostvold- Snare drum on Charade
**
01. Forty-Seventy Blues  12:06 
02. Not Yet  10:41
03. Not Yet  10:41  
04. Conversations, Pt. 1  10:40 
05. Conversations, Pt. 2  3:21 
06. Conversations, Pt. 3  9:14 
07. Charade  7:24 
08. Someday My Prince Will Come  6:35
**
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Grant GREEN - The Complete Blue Note Recordings Of Grant Green With Sonny Clark 1961-1962


Grant GREEN - The Complete Blue Note Recordings Of Grant Green With Sonny Clark 1961-1962

Jazz

Over a five-week period in early 1962, Grant Green recorded three amazing quartet sessions with Sonny Clark on piano, Sam Jones on bass, and Louis Hayes or Art Blakey on drums. As magnificent as the results were, the three albums, considered too progressive for Green's soul-jazz following, languished in the vaults for 18 years. In 1980, "Airegin," the session with Blakey, came out in the United States, while the two with Hayes ("Gooden's Corner" and "Oleo") came out only in Japan. Later issued briefly on Mosaic with three bonus tracks, they have since become collectors' items of legendary proportions. Now Blue Note is finally making them available on this specially-priced 2-CD set. Some of the best music Grant Green ever recorded.
**
Mosaic released a four-disc box set titled The Complete Blue Note With Sonny Clark in 1991, rounding up everything that the guitarist and pianist recorded together between 1961 and 1962. Blue Note's 1997 version of the set, The Complete Quartets With Sonny Clark, trims Mosaic's collection by two discs, offering only the quartet sessions (the Ike Quebec sessions, Born to Be Blue and Blue and Sentimental, are available on individual discs). In some ways, this actually results in a more unified set, since it puts Green and Clark directly in the spotlight, with no saxophone to complete for solos, but it doesn't really matter if the music is presented as this double-disc set, the four-disc box, or the individual albums — this is superb music, showcasing the guitarist and pianist at their very best. All of the sessions are straight-ahead bop but the music has a gentle, relaxed vibe that makes it warm, intimate, and accessible. Grant and Clark's mastery is subtle — the music is so enjoyable, you may not notice the deftness of their improvisation and technique — but that invests the music with the grace, style, and emotion that distinguishes The Complete Quartets. Small group hard bop rarely comes any better than this.
By Stephen Thomas Erlewine.
**
Grant Green - Guitar
Sonny Clark - Piano
Sam Jones - Bass
Art Blakey - Drums (cd1, #1-7)
Louis Hayes - Drums
**
Cd1
01. Airegin (Rollins) 7:32
02. It Ain't Necessarily So (Gershwin, Gershwin) 10:20
03. I Concentrate on You (Porter) 5:40
04. The Things We Did Last Summer (Cahn, Styne) 5:54
05. The Song Is You (Hammerstein, Kern) 7:44
06. Nancy (With the Laughing Face) (Silvers, VanHeusen) 6:20
07. Airegin [alternate take] (Rollins) 7:34
08. On Green Dolphin Street (Kaper, Washington) 6:25
09. Shadrack (MacGimsey) 6:20
10. What Is This Thing Called Love ? (Porter) 5:40
*
Cd2
01. Moon River (Mancini, Mercer) 5:34
02. Gooden's Corner (Green) 8:11
03. Two for One (Green) 7:38
04. Oleo (Rollins) 5:35
05. Little Girl Blue (Hart, Rodgers) 7:12
06. Tune-Up (Davis) 7:17
07. Hip Funk (Green) 8:35
08. My Favorite Things (Hammerstein, Rodgers) 8:28
09. Oleo [alternate take] (Rollins) 6:00
**
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Alan SKIDMORE - Alan Skidmore's Ubizo, Leipzig 2007


Alan SKIDMORE - Alan Skidmore's Ubizo, Leipzig 2007
All The Credits Go To *UBU*
(Alan Skidmore's Ubizo
31. Leipziger Jazztage
Leipzig (Germany),
Moritzbastei, October 3, 2007)

Jazz

This is the first supplement (at least one more to come) to my South Africal posts. Alan Skidmore, the sax player known from S.O.S. and other projects, was the first British jazz musician to visit post-Apartheid South Africa in the nineties. This led to the 1999 album "The Call", with Amampondo, a Cape Town group of drummers. Skidmore's Ubizo project continues in the same vein. "Ubizo" means "the calling" (as in "vocation") and adds German trumpet player Ingolf Burkhardt to the mix. They released an album in 2003 and were touring again in recent years. This is a long and fine recording I got from dime recently and find worthy to spread further, beyond the dime community.
**
Alan Skidmore- Tenor Sax
Ingolf Burkhardt- Trumpet, Flugelhorn
Steve Melling- Piano
Colin Towns- Keyboards
Mick Coady- Bass
Mike Paxton- Drums
Joe Legwabe- African Percussion
Jjkj Kanda- African Percussion
Musa Mboob- African Percussion
**
01. Band Intros AS, Sweet S.A. (14:07)
02. Evening Song, Salam Salam  (14:14)
03. Bridges Of Sand  10:22 >
04. Coat Of Many Summers  13:01
05. Dumisani  (9:22)
06. Bamboo Harmon  (7:40)
07. Africa, After The Rain  18:07
**
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