Monday, November 30, 2009

Ricky FORD - American-African Blues 1981


Ricky FORD - American - African Blues 1981

Jazz

That Ricky Ford means business on this pulsating album is evident from the outset of the opening American-African Blues. His passionate, bursting solo draws its inspiration roots all the way from Hawkins to Coltrane via Al Sears and Roland Kirk. On this and the other six Ford originals in this set, Ricky organised the tune structures to allow for the insertion of free improvised passages for himself and the other players.
Throughout the date Ricky's fellow musicians - Jaki Byard (piano), Milt Hinton (bass), Ben Riley (drums) - are able to indulge in classic interplay, to be free yet to function as a whole.
This album is indeed a worthy and historic documentation of four distinct and formidable artists dedicated to the continuum of American music and freedom of expression.
**
Ricky Ford- Tenor Sax
Jaki Byard- Piano
Milt Hinton- Bass
Ben Riley- Drums
**
01. American-African Blues (First Version) 10:46
02. Environ 7:05
03. Of 8:22
04. Complex Harmony 6:48
05. Descent 8:41
06. Mostly Arco 5:52
07. Encore 8:45
08. American-African Blues (2nd Version) 7:09
**
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Don "Sugarcane" HARRIS - Cup Full Of Dreams 1973


Don "Sugarcane" HARRIS - Cup Full Of Dreams 1973

Blues

Blues violinist Sugarcane Harris is on fire during this 1973 studio session for BASF, which features many of his regular collaborators of the period. Harris, who wrote all of the material heard on the date, mixes elements of jazz, country, and rock into his brand of blues. He is brilliant in the midtempo blues "Runnin' Away," though none of the solos that follow measure up to the leader's. "Hattie's Bathtub" is a catchy blues waltz. But it is the extended composition "Cup Full of Dreams" that showcases Harris' lyricism on his instrument. One amusing aspect of the LP is the obvious presence of guitarist Harvey Mandel, who evidently could not be named for contractual reasons, though his photo is barely disguised with an old-fashioned black bar over his eyes. Just a few years after this record was released, poor health put an end to the violinist's career. Sadly, this record is long out of print and somewhat hard to find.
By Ken Dryden, All Music Guide.
**
Victor Conte- Bass, Guitar 
Don "Sugarcane" Harris- Violin, Composer, Vocals, Producer 
Paul Lagos- Drums 
Harvey Mandel- Guitar 
Randy Resnick- Guitar 
Larry Taylor- Bass, Guitar (Bass) 
Dewey Terry- Percussion, Keyboards, Piano (Electric) 
**
A1. Runnin' Away   8:00
A2. Hattie's Bathtub   7:23
A3. Bad Feet   5:21
B1. Cup Full of Dreams   14:24
B2. Generation of Vipers   4:15
**
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The Aynsley DUNBAR - Retaliation 1968


The Aynsley DUNBAR Retaliation - The Aynsley DUNBAR Retaliation1968

Blues

I bought this vinyl album on a lark when I was in high school. It had just come out and I was intrigued by the name. I had no idea what to expect. Once I put it on the turntable, I was quite disappointed. It didn't rock at all! I wasn't really into the blues that much at the time. However, my friend Dennis was, and he borrowed the album. I eventually got it back, without the original cover, and kept it in my album collection in just a sleeve with the title hand-written on it.

Jump 40 years later and I burned it to a CD and have been listening to it on my long commute to work.

The one song I remember is Watch And Chain and hearing it again after so many years, brings back a rush of memories from high school. Though I never played it much, Dennis did, and it took plenty of abuse and is scratchy and poppy. All that noise actually adds to the charm of it now. An old scratchy blues album sounds better than one that is pristine, in my opinion.

For some reason, this band really nails the blues. They make it sound so authentic, especially for a bunch of Blokes. They somehow tapped into the genuine vibe and pulled off a great group of songs. All the songs are good, but I especially favor Watch and Chain, and the more extended cuts on side two.

This is British blues at its best and I highly recommend it for blues fans.
By Fred Rayworth.
**
A1. Watch 'n Chain  
A2. My Whisky Head Woman  
A3. Trouble No More  
A4. Double Lovin'  
A5. See See Baby  
A6. Roamin' & Ramblin'  

B1. Sage of Sydney Street  
B2. Memory of Pain  
B3. Mutiny
**
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Ahmad JAMAL - Intervals 1979


Ahmad JAMAL - Intervals 1979

Jazz

Ahmad Jamal's recording career became temporarily aimless as the 1970s were ending. This very forgettable LP features Jamal on both electric and acoustic piano, saddled by rather commercial arrangements. The tunes are not always bad (five are by the keyboardist), but the dated pop trappings and Jamal's near-anonymity on electric piano make this a set deserving of being quickly passed by.
By Scott Yanow, All Music Guide.
**
A1. You're Welcome, Stop On By 5:51
A2. Jordie  3:52
A3. So In Love 3:40
A4. Reggae 3:48 

B1. Boatride 5:17
B2. Exerpt From (My One And Only Love) 2:10
B3. The Tube 4:15
B4. Bones 6:23
**
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Sunday, November 29, 2009

Chico HAMILTON - Drumfusion 1962


Chico HAMILTON - Drumfusion 1962

Jazz

This is an LP long overdue to be reissued on CD. In 1960, Charles Lloyd succeeded Eric Dolphy in the Chico Hamilton Quintet, a cool jazz group famous for its use of a cello. However, since Nate Gershman (unlike his predecessor Fred Katz) did not improvise, the group was much more limited than its predecessors. By 1962, with the urging of Lloyd, Hamilton had completely revamped the personnel, having a quintet that replaced the cello with trombonist Garnett Brown and also included guitarist Gabor Szabo and bassist Albert Stinson. Drumfusion was the new band's debut and it is a strong effort, featuring group originals and exciting solos from Lloyd (on tenor and flute), Szabo, and Brown. The music is melodic at times but not boppish, free in spots but not avant-garde. This is a continually infectious and inspiring band, one that deserves to have all of its records reissued.
By Scott Yanow. AMG.
**
Albert Stinson- Bass
Chico Hamilton- Drums 
Gabor Szabo- Guitar
Charles Lloyd- Tenor Sax, Flute
Garnett Brown- Trombone 
**
A1. One For Joan 8:08
A2. Freedom Traveler (Part I - Prayer),(Part II - Journey) 6:16
A3. Tales 4:59

B1. Homeward 6:02
B2. A Rose For Booker 7:59
B3. Transfusion 4:54
**
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Grant GREEN - Born To Be Blue 1961


Grant GREEN - Born To Be Blue 1961

Jazz

The fluent guitarist shines in the company of big tenor Ike Quebec and pianist Sonny Clark on this reissue, recorded in late 1961 and early 1962. Though well versed in bebop and inspired a great deal by Charlie Parker, Green relished beautiful ballad melodies and the soulfulness of the blues. Both are readily on display here, especially considering the fact that both Quebec and Clark had similar tastes. Green handles slower tunes such as "My One and Only Love" and "Count Every Star" with extreme care and sensitivity, showing wonderful melodic creativity embellished by quick, crafty runs. The title track (offered in two versions) showcases Quebec's dense but delicate tenor, which betrays a notable Ben Webster influence. Of particular note are Green's molten readings of an uptempo "Someday My Prince Will Come" and of Bird's "Cool Blues."
By Marc Greilsamer.
**
Grant Green- Guitar
Ike Quebec- Tenor Sax
Sonny Clark- Piano
Sam Jones- Bass
Louis Hayes- Drums
**
01. Someday My Prince Will Come 6:30 
02. Born To Be Blue 4:54
03. Born To Be Blue (Alternate Take) 4:41
04. If I Should Lose You 6:05
05. Back In Your Own Back Yard 8:04
06. My One And Only Love 5:50
07. Count Every Star 6:21
08. Cool Blues 7:57
09. Outer Space 8:43
**
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Lalo SCHIFRIN and Bob BROOKMEYER - Samba Para Dos 1963


Lalo SCHIFRIN and Bob BROOKMEYER - Samba Para Dos 1963

Jazz

By the time this album was recorded (Feb. 1963), the bossa/samba craze was a year old; everyone, it seemed, was waxing a Brazilian-tinged LP to get in on the popular concept, especially on the Verve label. This actually was Brookmeyer's second samba outing; an earlier LP with Gary McFarland featuring this kind of music had already been recorded the year before. The earlier album had Brookmeyer fronting a small group (vibes, 2 guitars, and percussion); here he fronts a larger contingency (7 reeds, piano, guitar, and rhythm section). It starts with the title track, which is over 10 minutes long, and although it has a nice flute solo by Leo Wright, the song bogs down in a lengthy piano solo by Schifrin; things aren't off to a good start. (Schifrin has a tendency to get clunky in his playing, especially on up-tempo numbers, reminiscent of Dave Brubeck.) But then things really pick up. I GET A KICK OUT OF YOU and JUST ONE OF THOSE THINGS lend themselves well to the samba interpretation, and Brookmeyer swings hard on them (there's also a terrific guitar solo by Jimmy Raney on KICK). Phil Woods takes a much too short solo on IT'S ALL RIGHT WITH ME (his only solo on the whole Album) that practically jumps out of the speakers at you; it's marvelous. So the Album, which started off on shaky ground, ends up being not too bad at all.
By  Bomojaz.
**
A1 Samba para dos   10:00
A2 What Kind of Fool Am I?   2:58
A3 I Get a Kick out of You   4:37

B1 Just One of Those Things   3:25
B2 Time After Time   3:28
B3 It's All Right With Me   2:30
B4 My Funny Valentine   2:00
B5 But Not for Me   3:05
**
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Quincy JONES - In Cold Blood 1967


Quincy JONES - In Cold Blood 1967

Jazz

The true breakthrough for black composers in Hollywood came with Quincy Jones's riveting work on 1967's "In Cold Blood". That year, Jones did the music for both "In the Heat of the Night" and "In Cold Blood". Although his theme for "In the Heat of the Night", sung by the late Ray Charles, gained more popularity with the mass audience, critics devoted more attention to his work on "In Cold Blood", in which he pushed farthest the infusing of a jazz score with a deeply disquieting musical idiom.

Jones, a new Hollywood composer in the 1960s, demonstrated great flexibility and openness to experimentation, but he also displayed a capacity to let go of any posture of preciousness toward his own artistic creations when the situation demanded. For example, when Richard Brooks, the director of the film, disliked a section of Jones's score, Brooks instructed the sound mixer, Jack Solomon, to simply leave it out. Solomon, however, played Jones's composition backwards on the tape and decided to use the music in this way to accompany a scene where two drifters approach the farmhouse of their victims. Brooks was delighted with the results, as was Jones.

Perhaps the greatest compliment paid to Quincy Jones for his revolutionary score for "In Cold Blood" was the fact that he was only one of three persons listed (along with the film's director Richard Brooks and the book's author Truman Capote) on the original one-sheet movie poster used to advertise the film.
**
A1. In Cold Blood
A2. Clutter Family Theme
A3. Hangin' Paper
A4. Down Clutter's Lane
A5. Seduction
A6. Perry's Theme

B1. Lonely Bottles
B2. No Witnesses
B3. I'll Have To Kill You
B4. Nina
B5. Murder Scene
B6. The Corner
    (Vocals - Gil Bernal)
**
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Ricky FORD - Manhattan Blues 1989


Ricky FORD - Manhattan Blues 1989

Jazz

Ricky Ford is a musician of several substantial parts. A powerful tenor saxophonist, he has worked with the Mercer Ellington-led Duke Ellington band, Charles Mingus, the Mingus Dynasty, Lionel Hampton, the Newport All Stars and Abdullah Ibrahim. He also leads his own groups and is an original, continually searching composer as is evident in this set of originals.

Joining Ford on this set is Jaki Byard on piano, Milton Hinton on bass and Ben Riley on drums. Here, are four musicians with full and exhilarating command of their considerable resources.
**
Ricky Ford- Tenor Sax
Jaki Byard- Piano
Milt Hinton- Bass
Ben Riley- Drums
**
A1. In Walked Bud 8:09
A2. Misty 7:46
A3. Ode to Crispus Attucks 5:45

B1. Bop Nouveau 4:35
B2. My Little Strayhorn 6:00
B3. Manhattan Blues 6:28
B4. Half Nelson 6:01
**
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James COTTON - Live At Antone's Nightclub - 1988


James COTTON - Live At Antone's Nightclub - 1988
Recorded in July of 1987 at Antone's Night Club
Produced by Antone's Records & Tapes

Blues  

I am so glad I bought this CD when I did--when the used prices weren't so ridiculous! This CD is some classic Chicago blues, presented in a way only James "Superharp" Cotton could. Any Cotton album naturally has high expectations, seeing how Cotton played with Muddy Waters for a number of years before pursuing his long and successful solo career, but this album is up there with Cotton's best studio effort, "100% Coton".
Even though James Cotton has had a spectacular solo career, this live album consists most of blues standards. Three of the songs come from Muddy (Blow Wind and Gone to Main Street by Muddy, Hoochie Coochie Man being a Dixon-penned Muddy classic). Also an additional three songs come from Little Walter (Juke, It Ain't Right, and Oh Baby). Those six songs out the way, we are left with two more: Eyesight to the Blind, a Sonny Boy Williamson tune, and Midnight Creeper, the only Cotton original on the album. All are unique in their own way like only James Cotton could do.
By J. Cohen.
**
James Cotton- Harp, Vocals,
Matt "Guitar" Murphy- Guitar,
Luther Tucker- Guitar,
Calvin Jones- Bass,
Willie Smith- Drums,
Pinetop Perkins- Piano.
**
01. Blow Wind
02. Juke
03. It ain't right
04. Gone to mane street
05. Oh, Baby
06. Hoochie Coochie Man
07 Eyesight to the blind
08. Midnight Creeper
**
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Alexis KORNER - Me 1979


Alexis KORNER - Me 1979

Blues

After a well-received appearance at the Cambridge Folk Festival in the early 1980s, there were rumors afterward that he intended to become more active musically, but his health was in decline by this time. A chain smoker all of his life, Korner died of lung cancer at the beginning of 1984.
By Bruce Eder, All Music Guide.
**
A1. Honkey Tonk Woman   4:56
A2. Louise   4:05
A3. Hammer and Nails   3:41
A4. Santa Fé Blues   2:49
A5. Hong Long Blues   3:42

B1. Roberta   4:35
B2. Precious Lord   4:23
B3. Honour the Young Men   3:28
B4. And Again   0:50
B5. East St. Louis   3:01
**
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Taj MAHAL - The Real Thing, Live At The Fillmore East 1971


Taj MAHAL - The Real Thing, Live At The Fillmore East 1971

Blues

Taj Mahal's been chasing the blues around the world for years, but rarely with the passion, energy, and clarity he brought to his first three albums. Taj Mahal, The Natch'l Blues and The Real Thing are the sound of the artist, who was born in 1942, defining himself and his music. On his self-titled 1967 debut, he not only honors the sound of the Delta masters with his driving National steel guitar and hard vocal shout, but ladles in elements of rock and country with the help of guitarists Ry Cooder and the late Jessie Ed Davis. This approach is reinforced and broadened by The Natch'l Blues. What's most striking is Mahal's way of making even the oldest themes sound as if they're part of a new era. Not just through the vigor of his playing--relentlessly propulsive, yet stripped down compared with the six-string ornamentations of the original masters of country blues--but through his singing, which possesses a knowing insouciance distinct to post-Woodstock counterculture hipsters. It's the voice of an informed young man who knows he's offering something deep to an equally hip and receptive audience.
Soon, Mahal turned his multicultural vision of the blues even further outward. The live 1971 set, The Real Thing, finds him still carrying the Mississippi torch, while adding overt elements of jazz and Afro-Caribbean music to its flame. But it's overreaching. His band sounds under-rehearsed, and the arrangements seem more like rough outlines. Nonetheless, these albums set the stage for Mahal's career. (For a condensed version, try the fine The Best of Taj Mahal.) Today, he continues to make fine fusion albums, like 1999's Kulanjan, with Malian kora master Toumani Diabate, and less exciting but still eclectic recordings with his Phantom Blues Band.
By Ted Drozdowski.
**
Taj Mahal followed up Giant Step/De Ole Folks at Home (1969) with another double-disc concert platter whose title pretty much sums up the contents. The Real Thing (1971) is drawn from a mid-February run of shows at the Fillmore East in New York City where he, Spencer Davis, the Chambers Brothers, and Roberta Flack, among others, shared the bill. Mahal (vocals/banjo/guitar/harmonica/arranger/fife/harp/steel guitar/ harmonica) is supported by an interesting extended aggregate with a brass section consisting of Joseph Daley (tuba/horn/trombone), Bob Stewart (horn), and a pair of former Charles Mingus bandmembers, Earl McIntyre (horn) and Howard Johnson (horn). While at times they tend to overpower the usually intimate nature of the performances, that is certainly not the case for the majority of the arrangements. The opener, "Fishin' Blues," is a solo with Mahal accompanying himself on banjo. "Ain't Gwine to Whistle Dixie (Any Mo')" is significantly lengthened from the form found on Giant Step (1968) as it stretches nearly nine minutes and allows plenty of room for interaction, offering up a spirited fife interlude from Mahal. In addition to providing an overview from his back catalog, The Real Thing contains a few new compositions. The full ensemble gets a workout on the funky "Sweet Mama Janisse" and the toe-tappin' rural flavor of the instrumental "Tom and Sally Drake" is lightly augmented by a sole tuba -- presumably that of Johnson. Sleepy John Estes' "Diving Duck Blues" arguably submits the most successful incorporation of brass, sporting a driving, full-throttle rhythm and soulful interpretation. The 2000 CD reissue was extended to fit the entire live set, adding the previously unavailable "She Caught the Katy and Left Me a Mule to Ride," matching the intensity of the sizeable bluesy, closing jam "You Ain't No Street Walker Mama, Honey But I Do Love They Way You Strut."
By Lindsay Planer, All Music Guide.
**
Earl McIntyre- Horn
Billy Rich- Bass
Greg Thomas- Drums
John Hall- Guitar
John Simon- Keyboards
Joseph Daley- Tuba, Horn, Trombone (Valve)
Rocky Dzidzornu- Percussion
Bob Stewart- Horn
Howard Johnson- Horn
Taj Mahal- Banjo, Guitar, Harmonica, Fife, Harp, Vocals, National Steel Guitar, Chromatic Harmonica
**
A1. Fishin' Blues 2:45 
A2. Ain't Gwine To Whistle Dixie (Any Mo') 8:17 
A3. Sweet Mama Janisse 3:35

B1. Going Up To The Country, Paint My Mailbox Blue 3:07  
B2. Big Kneed Gal 4:45 
B3. You're Gonna Need Somebody On Your Bond 6:15

C1. Tom And Sally Drake 3:23
C2. Diving Duck Blues 3:30 
C3. John, Ain' It Hard 5:10

D1   You Ain't No Street Walker Mama, Honey But I Do Love The Way You Strut Your Stuff 18:56
**
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Doug SAHM, Amos GARRETT, Gene TAYLOR - The Return Of The Formerly Brothers 1987


Doug SAHM, Amos GARRETT, Gene TAYLOR - The Return Of The Formerly Brothers 1987

Blues

Texan folk hero Sir Doug Sahm meets underrated guitarist Amos Garrett and ex-Blasters keyboardist Gene Taylor and they cook like an Austin barbecue. (Originally released on Stony Plain Records in Canada in 1988, The Return Of The Formerly Brothers was released in the U.S. by Rykodisc in 1989.)
By Jeff Tamarkin, All Music Guide.
**
Frequently called the Formerly Brothers, Amos Garrett (Ian & Sylvia, Maria Muldaur, Paul Butterfield's Better Days), Doug Sahm (Sir Douglas Quintet) and Gene Taylor (the Blasters, Big Joe Turner, Rick Nelson, Canned Heat) formed at the 1986 Edmonton Folk Festival, playing roots-rock, country, R&B, folk and blues. So popular was the performance and subsequent tour of Canada that the group recorded The Return of the Formerly Brothers in 1988; it was released in America by Rykodisc. The album also features drummer Bohdan Hluszko and bassist Kit Johnson. By John Bush, All Music Guide.
**
This talented band is lead by Amos Garrett's on lead guitar, Gene Taylor on piano, and Doug Sahm on a variety of instruments. The lineup is rounded out by a tight rhythm section and a few guest musicians (most notably Queen Ida, who adds vocals and accordion to two numbers). Each of the three men takes a turn in the vocal spotlight, and their choices in material are consistent with their previous output. Doug Sahm's version of Bob Dylan's "Just Like a Woman" is perfect, with Garrett's unmistakable liquid guitar lines coursing through it. Gene Taylor, with his blues background (and stints with Canned Heat, the Blasters, and others), contributes a few of his roadhouse-fun originals. Amos Garrett's greatest work is on Terry Allen's "Amarillo Highway."
This cd includes two bonus tracks one of which is a 14 minute interview with Doug Sahm.
**
Amos Garrett- (Vocals, Guitar);
Doug Sahm- (Vocals, Guitar, Dobro, Organ);
Gene Taylor- (Vocals, Piano);
Queen Ida- (Vocals, Accordion);
Kit Johnson- (Vocals, Bass);
Michelle Josef- (Vocals, Drums).
**
01.Smack Dab in the Middle 3:44
02.Big Mamou 2:51
03.Teardrops on Your Letter 4:02
04.Drunk 4:08
05.Don't Tell Me 3:14
06.Coming Back Home 1:59
07.Sure Is a Good Thing 3:40
08.Amarillo Highway 4:01
09.Banks of the Old Pontchartrain 3:19
10.Just Like a Woman 5:15
11.Gene's Boogie 3:02
12.Queen of the Okanagan 3:57
13.Louis Riel  4:19
14.Doug Sahm Interview  14:07
**
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Clark HUTCHINSON - Retribution 1970


Clark HUTCHINSON - Retribution 1970

Blues

Clark-Hutchinson's debut album had been devoted entirely to long, tiresome psychedelic guitar instrumentals with Indian and blues-rock influences. On their second record, although some of that approach was retained, they at least branched out to some degree, adding some vocals and somewhat more deranged blues-rock tangents. And guess what? It's still indulgent psychedelic hard rock, often annoyingly so, all but one of the five tracks falling into the seven- to ten-minute range. It's some of the most lunkheaded stoner rock you'll come across, and if that seems like a churlishly unfair label, it's one they bring onto themselves with the first cut, "Free to Be Stoned."
For it's here they fly their inept freak flag high, a from-the-gutter, hysterical vocal declaring against a crude blues-rock backing, "I don't wanna be good, but I don't care if I'm bad, I don't want to feel happy, but I don't care if I feel sad...I just wanna be...STONED! STONED! STONED! STONED! For the rest of my natural life!" Just the kind of guy you want to hang out with for next half-hour, huh? The attitude-over-songwriting ethos continues to rule over most of the other tracks, including a tepid ten-minute cocktail jazz instrumental, a ten-minute standard blues-rocker featuring (like "Free to Be Stoned") some of the most disagreeably half-shouted British blues-rock vocals ever laid down, and a finale ("Death, the Lover") that comes off like a particularly bad Arthur Brown imitation in its high-pitched vocal and lyrical mania.
By Richie Unterberger. AMG.
**
Andy Clark- (Vocals, Keyboard),
Mick Hutchinson- (Guitar),
Stephen Amazing- (Bass),
Del Coverly- (Drums),
Walt Monahan- (Bass, 1968),
Franco Franco- (Drums, 1968)
**
A1. Free To Be Stoned 7:14
A2. After Hours 10:43
B1. In Another Way 3:38
B2. Best Suit 10:16
B3. Death, The Lover 7:15
**
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Saturday, November 28, 2009

Archie SHEPP - Things Have Got to Change! 1971


Archie SHEPP - Things Have Got to Change! 1971

Jazz

Archie Shepp's Thing Have Got To Change, released in 1971 solidified the saxophonists reputation as a soulful, yet radical free jazz artist motivated by social commentary and cultural change.  The record which features many of Shepp's longtime comrades including Joe Lee Wilson, Beaver Harris, Grechan Moncur III, and Ronald Wilson integrates the symphonic-like structure of the politically charged compositions with the spirited, cathartic sound for which Shepp is so notorious. 

"Dr. King, The Peaceful Warrior", a stripped down anthem style duet between Shepp and Cal Massey, provides a striking contrast with the album's predominately thick, almost ecclesiastic orchestration.  Ultimately, Things Have Got To Change is a vivid snapshot of a social conscious artist who not only wore his emotions on his sleeves but expressed them with unsurpassed artistry and prowess.
**
Anita Branham, Anita Shepp, Barbara Parsons, Claudette Brown, Ernestina Parsons, Jody Shayne, Johnny Shepp, Sharon Shepp- Backing Vocals
Roland Wilson- Bass
Beaver Harris- Drums 
Dave Burrell- Electric Piano
Billy Butler, David Spinozza- Guitar
Calo Scott, Hetty 'Bunchy' Fox, Juma Sutan, Ollie Anderson- Percussion
James Spaulding- Saxophone [Alto], Flute [Piccolo]
Howard Johnson- Saxophone [Baritone]
Archie Shepp- Saxophone [Tenor, Soprano]
Charles Greenlee, Grechan Moncur III- Trombone 
Roy Burrowes, Ted Daniel- Trumpet
Joe Lee Wilson- Vocals
**
A1. Money Blues (Part I,II AND III) 18:21
B1. Dr. King, The Peaceful Warrior 2:29  
B2. Things Have Got To Change (Part I,II) 16:53
**
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Donald BYRD And 125th Street,N.Y.C - Love Byrd 1981


Donald BYRD And 125th Street,N.Y.C - Love Byrd 1981

Jazz

Funky electric groove from Donald Byrd -- a post Mizell effort that's still burning in a crisp groove similar to his classic 70s Blue Note work -- one that's absolutely dripping with keys! Isaac Hayes produced this one, and also played a lot of those keyboards on the session with Byrd's 125 St Band -- grooving on acoustic piano and Rhodes, plus vibes and synth. Ronnie Garnett's bass is tight and funky throughout, with William Duckett on guitar, Albert Crawford, Jr on piano, keys & clavinet, Myra Walker on acoustic piano, and some groovy female chorus vocals that's to Isaac's Hot Buttered Soul Unlimited! Tracks include the great mellow "I Love Your Love", plus "I Feel Like Loving You Today", "Butterfly", "Love Has Come Around", and "I'll Always Love You".
From Dusty Groove.
**
Ronnie Garrett- Electric Bass
Conductor, Strings [Arranged By], Horns [Arranged By] - Bill Purse
Eric Hines- Drums

William "Country" Duckett*- Electric Guitar
Charles Lane- Horns [Contractor]
Isaac Hayes- Producer, Engineer [Remixing], Strings, Horns [Arranged By], Vocals [Contractor], Percussion, Vocals
Peter Bertonlino- Strings [Contractor]
Donald Byrd- Trumpet
Diane Evans , Diane Williams , 125th Street, N.Y.C.* , Pat Lewis , Rose Williams- Vocals
Hot Buttered Soul Unlimited*- Vocals [Credited To]
**
A1. Love Has Come Around 7:53
      Electric Piano [Fender Rhodes], Synthesizer [Prophet] - Albert "Chip" Crawford, Jr.*
      Piano [Acoustic], Synthesizer - Isaac Hayes
      Written-By - William Duckett
A2. Butterfly 6:04
      Electric Piano [Fender Rhodes] - Albert "Chip" Crawford, Jr.*
      Piano [Acoustic] - Myra Walker
      Vibraphone - Isaac Hayes
      Written-By - Andrew Stevens
A3. I Feel Like Loving You Today 6:57
      Piano [Acoustic] - Albert "Chip" Crawford, Jr.*
      Written-By - Isaac Hayes

B1. I Love Your Love 6:57
      Electric Piano [Fender Rhodes] - Albert "Chip" Crawford, Jr.*
      Piano [Acoustic], Synthesizer, Written-by - Isaac Hayes
      Written-By - Aaron Mills , Andrew Stevens , William Duckett
B2. I'll Always Love You 5:12
      Electric Piano [Fender Rhodes] - Albert "Chip" Crawford, Jr.*
      Piano [Acoustic], Vibraphone - Isaac Hayes
      Written-By - Donald Byrd
B3. Love For Sale 6:04
      Electric Piano [Fender Rhodes], Clavinet - Albert "Chip" Crawford, Jr.*
      Piano [Acoustic] - Isaac Hayes
      Written-By - Cole Porter
B4. Falling 2:59
      Piano [Acoustic] - Albert "Chip" Crawford, Jr.*
      Written-by, Electric Piano [Fender Rhodes] - Isaac Hayes
**
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Sonny ROLLINS - Freedom Suite 1958


Sonny ROLLINS - Freedom Suite 1958
Recorded in New York City on February 11 (tracks 2-6),
and March 7 (track 1), 1958

Jazz

Tenor saxophonist Sonny Rollins' last Riverside album was reissued on this Original Jazz Classics CD. Jamming in a pianoless trio with bassist Oscar Pettiford and drummer Max Roach, Rollins is very creative, stretching out on his lengthy "Freedom Suite," clearly enjoying investigating the obscure Noel Coward melody "Someday I'll Find You," turning the show tune "Till There Was You" into jazz, and finding beauty in "Shadow Waltz" and "Will You Still Be Mine?" A near masterpiece.
Scott Yanow. All Music Guide
**
Oscar Pettiford- Bass
Max Roach- Drums
Sonny Rollins- Teno Sax
**
A1. The Freedom Suite 19:17

B1. Someday I'll Find You 4:37
B2. Will You Still Be Mine? 2:55
B3. Till There Was You (Take 3) 4:55
B4. Till There Was You (Take 4) 5:00
B5. Shadow Waltz 4:11
**
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The Rascals - Peaceful World 1971


The Rascals - Peaceful World  1971

Jazz

Peaceful World is a wonderful blend of soul, jazz, and funk that never found an audience. Perhaps it was because the positive sentiments expressed in the lyrics were unfortunately becoming passé; perhaps it was the diversity of the two-record set itself. Despite its lack of commercial success, this was an artistic triumph for Felix Cavaliere. With a supporting cast including jazz luminaries Joe Farrell, Hubert Laws, Alice Coltrane, and Ron Carter, Cavaliere creates a musical vision of the Peaceful World conjured up by the album's title. The single, "Love Me," which barely cracked the Hot 100, is a piece of funk in a Sly Stone vein. Guitarist Buzz Feiten's "In and Out of Love" is one of those shoulda-been-a-hit-single songs. Many of the tracks, including the side-long (21:25) title track, are mellow jazz excursions. This ambitious album took the Rascals to the place Cavaliere had been headed over the course of the last couple of albums -- but, sadly, the fans didn't follow.
By Jim Newsom, All Music Guide.
**
A1. Sky Trane 5:47
A2. In And Out Of Love 3:22 
A3. Bit Of Heaven 3:28
A4. Love Me 3:46

B1. Mother Nature Land 3:28
B2. Icy Water 4:28
B3. Happy Song 3:40
B4. Love Letter 5:26

C1. Little Dove 6:39
C2. Visit To Mother Nature Land 5:03
C3. Getting Nearer 8:56

D1. Peaceful World 21:25
**
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John Lee HOOKER with The Groundhogs 1964


John Lee HOOKER with The Groundhogs 1964

Blues

Hooker & the Hogs captures John Lee Hooker with his 1964-65 backing band the Groundhogs — guitarist Tony McPhee, organist Tom Parker, drummer Dave Boorman and bassist Peter Cruikshank. Eleven tracks are compiled featuring the Hogs, with four bonus tracks of Hooker solo performances added on for good measure.
By Steve Huey 
**
McPhee and the Groundhogs' most important musical legacy, this 1996 reissue of Hooker & The Hogs has an unusual history. Tony McPhee and the Groundhogs first played with John Lee Hooker in June of 1964, when John Mayall & the Bluesbreakers were unable to fulfill a commitment to back Hooker on the final week of his British tour. The Groundhogs were deputized on the spot and played their first show with him at the Twisted Wheel in Manchester. At the end of the week, Hooker told McPhee how much he liked working with his band and agreed to use the Groundhogs as his backing band on his next visit to England. Hooker was back in May and June of 1965, and not only used them as his band but recorded this album with the Groundhogs. The band was Tony McPhee on guitar, Peter Cruickshank on bass, Dave Boorman on drums, and Tom Parker on keyboards -- some of the stuff here may have surfaced elsewhere, on the Interchord label (as Don't Want Nobody) with brass dubbed on, but this release consists of the undubbed recordings. The sound is raw, tight, and raunchy, some of the best band-backed recordings of Hooker's career. He's notoriously difficult to play support for because of the spontaneity of his work, but these guys keep up and then some, adding engaging flourishes and grace notes. Hooker is in excellent voice, and his material is as strong as any album in his output, rough, dark, and moody. The ominous, surging "Little Dreamer" is worth the price of admission all by itself. The 11 tracks with the Groundhogs are rounded out with four Hooker solo bonus tracks, which are even louder and more savage than the Groundhogs' stuff, though a little noisy (like that ever mattered with The Hook).
By Bruce Eder. AMG.
**
01.Mai Lee  (3:28)
02.I'm Losing You  (3:51)
03.Little Girl Go Back to School  (3:50)
04.Little Dreamer  (4:17)
05.Don't Be Messin' With My Bread  (3:19)
06.Bad Luck and Trouble  (4:00)
07.Waterfront  (4:11)
08.No One Pleases Me But You  (2:28)
09.It's Rainin' Here  (3:21)
10.It's a Crazy Mixed Up World  (4:14)
11.Seven Days and Seven Nights  (3:38)
**
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John MAYALL - Jazz Blues Fusion 1972


John MAYALL - Jazz Blues Fusion 1972

Blues

Jazz Blues Fusion is a Live album by John Mayall, the first side is from a gig in Boston on 18th November 1971,
and the second side was selected from two concerts at Hunter College, New York on 3rd and 4th December 1971.
**
This is a ***** superb album that is a must for any fan of blues or jazz or of jazz blues fusion. It is second as a John Mayall "Jazz Blues fusion" album only to the hard to find John Mayall album "Moving On" (which begs the question: when is this Masterpiece going to be issued on CD?). The most exceptional track on this album in my book is "Change Your Ways", in which John Mayall belts out a lyrical, funky, poetic message to his girlfriend, backed beautifully by sax, trumpets, lead guitar, and his own masterful blues harp.
By Unknown.
**
Larry Taylor- Bass
Freddy Robinson- Guitar
John Mayall- Guitar, Vocal,Harmonica,Piano
Ron Selico- Percussion
Clifford Solomon- Saxophone
Blue Mitchell- Trumpet

A1. Country Road 6:55
A2. Messin' Around 2:40
A3. Good Times Boogie 8:20
A4. Change Your Ways 3:25

B1. Dry Throat 6:20
B2. Exercise In C Major 8:10
B3. Got To Be This Way 6:15
**
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Memphis SLIM - Alone with My Friends 1961


Memphis SLIM - Alone with My Friends 1961

Blues

Memphis Slim devoted all but one of the ten songs on this April 1961 session to covers of some of his favorite songwriters. He's only accompanied by his own piano playing as he provides serviceable, laidback interpretations of numbers by Big Bill Broonzy, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Willie Dixon, Sonny Boy Williamson, and others, as well as his own "Sunnyland Train." Not the first or last place to check out Slim on record.
By Richie Unterberger.
**
01. Highway 51 Blues  4:15
02. I Feel So Good  2:45
03. Rock Me, Momma  3:50
04. Goin' Down Slow  3:40
05. Sittin' on Top of the World  3:40
06. Sunnyland Train  3:55
07. Goin' Down to the River  3:00
08. I Just Want to Make Love to You  3:55
09. I Can Hear My Name A-Ringin'  4:00
10. Going Back to My Plow  4:45
**
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Nobby REED – Here I Am 2007


Nobby REED – Here I Am 2007

Blues

This is my second solo cd,first being Guitar On My Back, recorded in 1996.I am celebrating 10 years sobriety, so I decided to do another solo cd, and Jason was available, and that also made it fun to do.
Once again I'm handling all the guitars, bass,and vocals,and as I said, this cd features Jason Corbiere on drums,(he's played with Roomful Of Blues,Eddie Kirkland, and Lou Pride,) he also played 4 tracks on my first solo cd. Jason is from Swanton vt, as is myself.I had the pleasure to watch, Jason grow into the fine drummer that he is today!
I have 4 guest harpman on the cd, northern Vermont has many a talented blues harp players, and here are a few.I also have a good friend , and a great sax player on 2 tracks.The last track features Mr Charlie,from his radio show,Blues For Breakfast on WIZN in Burlington,Vt. it was recorded last year live on the air, when I was a guest promoting my NRP cd Hold The Truth.
This is the 3rd cd Ive recorded in my studio,I 'm learning more with each recording, and this one is mastered by Andre @ West Street Digital.I feel this one sounds better!!
By Nobby Reed.
**
Nobby has not only done it again, he has outdone himself yet again. His celebration of 10 years sobriety is fantastic, and his music has always been inspirational in my six plus years of sobriety. But, onto the music...his addition of some Delta style blues along with his searing electric blues makes for a new synergy as yet unseen by this virtuoso blues guitarist and band. His tasteful additions of sax, organ and harp round out what is Nobby's best effort to date, and I can only hope he continues to come out with new music that keeps him comfortably in the ranks of the finest bluesman alive today. Thanks, Nobby, for just being Nobby.....!
By  Jim Tremblay.
**
01.Here I Am (4:31)
02.The Road I'm On (4:49)
03.The Afterburn (4:09)
04.Surrender (7:06)
05.Feel Something (5:52)
06.All I Got Left Is a Song (3:29)
07.Never Let Me Down Easy (4:45)
08.Blues from the Harp (4:48)
09.Living a Lie (3:55)
10.Over Ez (4:47)
11.Think of Me (5:41)
12.Tears in My Eyes (4:32)
**
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Taj MAHAL - Taj Mahal 1968


Taj MAHAL - Taj Mahal 1968

Blues

Taj Mahal's debut album was a startling statement in its time and has held up remarkably well. Recorded in August of 1967, it was as hard and exciting a mix of old and new blues sounds as surfaced on record in a year when even a lot of veteran blues artists (mostly at the insistence of their record labels) started turning toward psychedelia. The guitar virtuosity, embodied in Taj Mahal's slide work (which had the subtlety of a classical performance), Jesse Ed Davis's lead playing, and rhythm work by Ry Cooder and Bill Boatman, is of the neatly stripped-down variety that was alien to most records aiming for popular appeal, and the singer himself approached the music with a startling mix of authenticity and youthful enthusiasm. The whole record is a strange and compelling amalgam of stylistic and technical achievements -- filled with blues influences of the 1930s and 1940s, but also making use of stereo sound separation and the best recording technology. The result was numbers like Sleepy John Estes' "Diving Duck Blues," with textures resembling the mix on the early Cream albums, while "The Celebrated Walkin' Blues" (even with Cooder's animated mandolin weaving its spell on one side of the stereo mix) has the sound of a late '40s Chess release by Muddy Waters. Blind Willie McTell ("Statesboro Blues") and Robert Johnson ("Dust My Broom") are also represented, in what had to be one of the most quietly, defiantly iconoclastic records of 1968. ~ Bruce Eder
Though these 1968 sides were cut in LA at the apex of the burgeoning counterculture movement, the main influences at play here are those of the Mississippi Delta blues. Featuring early performances from Ry Cooder and Jesse Ed Davis, TAJ MAHAL is the joyfully confident debut that propelled the eponymous bluesman to national recognition. Comparable to similar experiments by Paul Butterfield, Mike Bloomfield and British blues maven John Mayall, Mahal's sound is both intensely traditional and aggressively pure.
For an example of the former, check out the album's closer, "The Celebrated Walkin' Blues," the intro of which sounds as if it could have been recorded any time in the previous 30 years, while "Statesboro Blues," with Davis's thrillingly raw slide interjections featured heavily throughout, is an intensely focused performance still capable of producing chills decades after the fact. There's no tinkering with genre here, as was later to become the style with countless '60s and '70s blues rock bands--what's on offer on TAJ MAHAL is a direct electrified line to the heart and soul of a seminal American art form. This edition features alternate artwork to the original, chosen by Mahal himself, and contemporary liner notes by celebrated critic Stanley Crouch.Entertainment Weekly.
**
Jessie Edwin Davis- Lead Guitar, Piano
Ryland P. Cooder- Rhythm Guitar, Mandolin
James Thomas- Bass
Sanford Konikoff- Drums
Taj Mahal- Vocals, Slide Guitar, Harp
Bill Boatman- Rhythm Guitar
Gary Gilmore- Bass
Charles Blackwell- Drums
**
A1. Leaving Trunk 4:49  
A2. Statesboro Blues 2:58 
A3. Checkin' Up On My Baby 4:54 
A4. Everybody's Got To Change Sometime 2:56 

B1. E Z Rider  3:03 
B2. Dust My Broom 2:37  
B3. Diving Duck Blues 2:40 
B4. The Celebrated Walkin' Blues 8:52
**
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Thelonious MONK - Monk In Tokyo 1963


Thelonious MONK - Monk In Tokyo 1963

Jazz

This recording of the Thelonious Monk Quartet, taped on May 21,1963 at Tokyo's Sankei Hall, was first issued at the beginning of the eighties.Following the great "It Club" and "Jazz Workshop" reissues on Columbia,this concert,although it's the shortest of those three live performances, may be the greatest.Thelonious was a lucky guy: he always had great musicians to play his very difficult music; bassists John Ore,Butch Warren,Ahmed Abdul Malik,Larry Gales,Al McKibbon;drummers Ben Riley,Art Blakey,Frankie Dunlop; and the immense Charlie Rouse, a very underrated tenor sax player,and simply one of the top tenor saxophonists of the jazz history.
By the way, Charlie Rouse seems to be the star of the date, because he plays with absolute ferocity all through the concert.
Frankie Dunlop's hard swinging drumming remains me of Kansas City's days with the imperial Jo Jones.Monk's playing is very abundant, and of course, completely amazing: listen to his solos on "Hackensack" ,or "Blue Monk",in which Dunlop sometimes plays just like Sam Woodyard.There is terrifying music in this set,and an intensity of swing and freedom that has rarely been reached.The magnificent "Pannonica",written by Monk and dedicated to Baroness Nica de Koenigswtarter,is very close to Tadd Dameron's writing, and marvelously played by Charlie Rouse.I don't know if Rouse ever better played than during this concert."Just a gigolo",a Monk's favorite,is a short solo piece.This tune, which happened to be one of Louis Prima's greatest hits,is here played in a very sad and desperate way;Monk recorded it several times,always in the same mood.Remember his definitive version on his "Solo Monk" album on Columbia,one of the ten greatest albums ever recorded in the jazz history.If you love Thelonious Monk's music,this is a must to have,one hour and a half of very great music.
By  JEAN-MARIE JUIF.
**
A smaller serving than the refurbished Live at the Jazz Workshop, Live in Tokyo is nevertheless a welcome meal for Monk fans. Previously an expensive Japan-only release, this excellently recorded 1963 visit finds the Monk/Charlie Rouse/Butch Warren/Frankie Dunlop quartet in enthusiastic fettle. On Monk's first visit to the country, he seems determined to offer as many sides of his art as possible. From "Just a Gigolo," given a solo reading that's sprightly even for this cherished favorite of the pianist, to extended takes on "Hackensack" and "Blue Monk" that provide dramatic climaxes to the show (Dunlop's interaction and interjections on the latter handily recall Art Blakey's explosive work on the 1954 Prestige version) this is one high-powered résumé. Listeners will understand why Monk was welcomed back lovingly to Japan several more times: judging from the audience response here, he made nothing but friends on this initial trip.
By Rickey Wright.
**
Charlie Rouse- Saxophone,
Butch Warren- Bass,
Frankie Dunlop- Drums
Thelonious Monk- Pian
**
Disc 1
01. Straight, No Chaser  9:47
02. Pannonica  7:45
03. Just A Gigolo  2:27
04. Evidence (Justice)  7:51
05. Jackie-ing  5:07
06. Bemsha Swing  4:25
07. Epistrophy  1:11

Disc 2
01. I'm Getting Sentimental Over You  9:30
02. Hackensack  11:00
03. Blue Monk  13:18
04. Epistrophy  8:26
**
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Friday, November 27, 2009

John Lee HOOKER - Never Get Out Of The Blues Alive 1978


John Lee HOOKER - Never Get Out Of The Blues Alive 1978

Blues

Old-school fans will be pleased to note that, even as the production on Hooker's albums was improving throughout the '70s, there was never any dilution of his hard-core traditional blues aesthetic. NEVER GET OUT OF THESE BLUES ALIVE is no exception, with slow, heavy-lidded blues shuffles like "Country Boy" fitted seamlessly beside such harder-driving jams as "Boogie With The Hook."
A full electric band, fleshed out on a few tracks with piano, violin, organ, and slide guitar, adds textures that are at once swirling and down-home. Hooker is joined by guests as distinguished as Elvin Bishop, mouthharp master Charlie Musselwhite, and--surprise!--Van Morrison, with whom Hooker duets on the title track. Overall, NEVER is a strong addition to the Hooker catalog.
**
Following the legendary bluesman's popular collaboration with Canned Heat, this album continues his work with mostly younger musicians and predates similar projects The Healer and Mr. Lucky by about 20 years. Van Morrison spans the gap by appearing on this 1972 release and Mr. Lucky. Elvin Bishop, Charlie Musselwhite, and even Steve Miller contribute here. Jazz violinist Michael White helps Boogie With the Hook take off and adds a mournful touch to the harrowing T.B. Sheets, which is much more restrained here than on the earlier debut release by Morrison.
By Mark Allan. AMG.
**
John Lee Hooker, Van Morrison- (Vocals, Guitar);
Luther Tucker, Ray McCarty, Paul Wood- (Guitar);
Benny Rowe, Elvin Bishop- (Slide Guitar);
Michael White- (Violin);
Charlie Musselwhite- (Harmonica);
Mark Naftalin- (Piano);
Robert Hooker- (Electric Piano, Organ, Keyboards);
Steven Miller- (Organ);
Cliff Coultier- (Electric Piano);
Gino Skaggs, John Kahn, Mel Brown- (Bass);
Ron Beck, Chuck Crimelli, Ken Swank- (Drums).
**
A1. Bumblebee, Bumblebee 4:11
A2. Hit The Road 2:55
A3. Country Boy 7:00
A4. Boogie With The Hook 6:29

B1. T.B. Sheets 4:57
B2. Letter To My Baby 3:56
B3. Never Get Out Of These Blues Alive 10:18
**
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Willie "Big Eyes" SMITH - Way Back 2006


Willie "Big Eyes" SMITH - Way Back 2006

Blues

With too many pop-aimed "all-star" discs available, this union of journeyman players--featuring former Muddy Waters drummer Willie "Big Eyes" Smith--just doing their thing is refreshing. Especially since their thing is old-school ensemble-style Chicago blues, played with ironclad taste, feel, and authenticity. What's new is that Smith cedes the drum seat to his son Kenny for most of these songs and compliments his weathered, Arkansas-born country voice with his own capable harmonica playing. James Cotton ups the harp ante on two cuts, and fellow Waters vets bassist Calvin Jones, pianist Pinetop Perkins (who's 92), and guitarist Bob Margolin join in. Smith's own "Blues and Trouble," a spare, haunted duet with Margolin, is especially moving, right from their twined harmonica and slide-guitar introduction. Even on the band numbers there's a respect for space and sonic detail that's the work of masters delivering performances to support and complement each other. Somewhere in heaven, Muddy is smiling down at these men he mentored.
By Ted Drozdowski.
**
Willie "Big Eyes" Smith is best known as the longtime drummer in the Muddy Waters Band. With seven W.C. Handy awards for blues drumming and six Grammy awards with the Legendary Blues Band, Smith has already left his mark on the music world. At the age of 17, Willie ventured to Chicago where he saw his first Muddy Waters performance. He was soon hooked on the blues and decided to stay. He played in various groups before settling into the drummer's seat behind Muddy Waters.
**
Willie "Big Eyes" Smith is most often recalled as the longtime drummer in the Muddy Waters Band (he occupied the drum chair in the group from 1961 through 1980), but he was a harmonica player well before he was a drummer (his hard-charging harmonica can be heard on Bo Diddley's "Diddy Wah Diddy" from 1955) and he has led his own blues ensembles from time to time. Way Back, a pleasant set recorded in 2005 and produced by Bob Corritore, puts Smith front and center, and while no one would accuse him of being the equal of Muddy Waters as a bandleader, the 73-year-old Smith projects an intangible joy through the 11 songs here, half of which he wrote. Backed by what amounts to a superstar blues band, with the great, unsung Bob Margolin on guitar, a seemingly ageless 93-year-old Pinetop Perkins on piano, and guest shots by James Cotton and others, Smith delivers several variations on the good, old and undeniably durable Chicago blues shuffle, including the opener, a cover of Jimmy Reed's "Don't Say That No More" and a gleeful version of Waters' "Read Way Back," both of which feature Smith's steady and somehow endearingly fragile vocals, and his strong, unhurried harmonica lines. Smith does play drums on a pair of tracks, "Lowdown Blues" and "I Want You to Love Me (Trust Me)," as well, but most of the drumming is from Kenny "Beady Eyes" Smith, Willie's son. The clear highlight is a wonderfully simple, atmospheric, and haunting Willie Smith original, "Blues and Trouble," which builds powerfully on just Smith's vocal and harmonica and Margolin's brilliant electric slide guitar playing. Nothing here is going to reshape the contemporary blues world, and truthfully, these kinds of Chicago blues shuffles have been done a thousand times by a thousand blues bands. But maybe that's the point, actually. Smith is one of the musicians who helped create and shape those rhythms, and this album is evidence that he still knows what to do with them.
By Steve Leggett.
**
Willie "Big Eyes" Smith- (Vocals, Harmonica, Drums);
Frank Krakowski- (Guitar);
Bob Stroger, Calvin "Fuzz" Jones- (Bass Guitar);
Billy Flynn, Bob Margolin, Johnny Rapp- (Guitar);
James Cotton , Bob Corritore- (Harmonica);
Pinetop Perkins- (Piano);
Kenny Smith- (Drums).
**
01. Don't Say That No More 4:09
02. I Don't Trust You Man 4:18
03. Read Way Back 3:02
04. Tell Me Mama 4:04
05. If You Don't Believe I'm Leaving 3:41
06. Lowdown Blues 4:49
07. Woman's World 5:16
08. Don't Start Me Talkin' 4:14
09. Blues And Trouble 4:41
10. I Want You To Love Me (Trust Me) 2:38
11. Eye To Eye 6:36
**
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The Siegel-Schwall Band - Sleepy Hollow 1972


The Siegel-Schwall Band - Sleepy Hollow 1972

Blues

"Sleepy Hollow" was Siegel-Schwall's second effort for their new label, "Wooden Nickel Records" Released in 1972, it broke new ground with hits "Hey Billie Jean" and "Something's Wrong". Check out the harp workout Corky gives to "Billie Jean", then listen to the greased lightning fretwork Jim puts into "Something's Wrong"....whew!! How do dey do dat?? "You Don't Love Me Like That" is a blues boogie like you always wanted to hear, footstompin' music and awesome slide guitar. Rollo Radford, bass player extraordinaire, gets a tune here too, with an original called "I Wanna Love Ya" and appropriately, it opens the record setting the tone for what's to come. He has a very tuneful and powerful voice, and it's always a treat to hear Rollo belt one out. Jim's "Blues For A Lady" is the longest cut, and also the quietest...it's a slow blues and tells a story of love for his then wife Cherie, in Jim's own special way. And Jim even visits country music with his hilarious "Sick To My Stomach" in which he sings about the gastric distress he experiences whenever he thinks of his girl being with another man.
By William H. Haines.
**
Corky Siegel- Vocals, Harp and Piano
Jim Schwall- Guitar and Vocals
Rollow Radford- Bass and Vocals
Sheldon Ira "Shelly" Plotkin- Drums
**
Heads:

01.I Wanna Love You 4:01
02.Somethin's Wrong 4:12
03.Sleepy Hollow 3:33
04.Blues For A Lady 8:35

Tails:

05.His Good Time Band 3:59
06.You Don't Love Me Like That 3:31
07.Sick To My Stomach 2:23
08.Always Thinkin' Of You Darlin' 3:30
09.Hey Billie Jean 6:06
**
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Kilborn Alley Blues Band - Tear Chicago Down 2007


Kilborn Alley Blues Band - Tear Chicago Down 2007

Blues

The Kilborn Alley Blues Band is the real deal, a rip snortin', fire breathin' gang that puts heart and soul into every note they play. Gritty, raw, and a bit sloppy in the best sense of the word, they hold nothing back and play the blues with a nasty rock edge that will appeal to youngsters as well as die-hard fans. They kick things off with "I'm Spent," a Chicago-meets-the Delta rave-up with hints of Little Walter in the wailing harmonica work of Joe Asselin. Andrew Duncanson lays back on the lead guitar to deliver a sweaty lead vocal while Asselin's honking accents up the ante. "Christmas in County" has a Memphis soul feel, the sad tale of a Christmas Eve drug bust, with stinging lead guitar work from Duncanson and wailing harp from Asselin laid down over the sinister groove of Chris Breen's bass and Ed O'Hara's drums. "Come Home Soon" has a bit of Al Green in its arrangement, a sad tale of a soldier in Iraq longing for his family. Sideman Gerry Hundt's organ provides a churchy, sanctified vibe to the proceedings, complementing Duncanson's sparse, stinging guitar and weary vocal. "Redneck in a Soul Band" is played tongue in cheek with a bouncy, bluegrass-like rhythm. Duncanson's singing is pure Chicago while Asselin's country blues harp zigzags in and out of the mix like a hungry fly dive bombing a puddle of barbecue sauce. Breen's extended melodic bassline brings extra tension to the aching soul of "It's a Pity." Duncanson's big, emotional vocal and his searing guitar set up Asselin's minimal but effective solo on this tale of anger and heartache. On funky dance tracks like "Lay It Down" and the title track, the ensemble lays down deep grooves marked by solos with an innate swing that's always impressive. Every member of this fine quintet can play their ass off, with Duncanson's guitar and Asselin's harp the obvious standouts, but everyone in the ensemble contributes formidable chops to this blistering set. ~ j. poet, All Music Guide
--
The Kilborn Alley Blues Band is a ferocious young band receiving tremendous national and international attention. In 2007 and 2008 the guys in KABB have/will play the Chicago Blues Festival, The Cincinnati Blues Festival, The Heritage Blues Music Fest in West Virginia, The Bucks County R&B Picnic in Pennsylvania, the Mississippi Valley Blues Festival in Iowa, the Budweiser Illinois Blues Festival, the Hot Licks Blues Festival in Ohio, Summer Camp and the Beluga Nights Summer Music Series in Fairbanks, Alaska-- among many others.
Their 2006 Blue Bella Records release Put It in the Alley went to number 8 on the Living Blues magazine national blues radio charts and earned the band a 2007 Blues Music Award (formerly known as the W.C. Handy Awards-- the highest international awards in the genre) nomination for "Best New Artist-- Debut." Their 2007 Blue Bella release Tear Chicago Down went to number 7 on the Living Blues radio charts and has gained Kilborn Alley Blues Band a second BMA nomination, this one for "Best Contemporary Blues Album." Tear Chicago Down was recently runner-up to Koko Taylor for in the Bluescritics reader's vote for "Best Contemporary Blues Album" for 2007.

They have accompanied and jammed with the likes of Honeyboy Edwards, the Bobby Rush Band, Johnny “Yard Dog” Jones, Louisiana Red, Lurrie Bell, MarK Hummel, Joyce Lawson, Eddie C. Campbell, Bill Lupkin, Billy “Soul” Bonds, the late Percy Strother, Sonny Rhodes, Nick Moss, Mary Lane, Eddie Taylor, Jr., Taildragger Jones, Mississippi Bill Abel, Frankie Lee, Master James Farrow, Pee Wee Hayes, Kate Hoddinott Moss, the late Harmonica Khan, Shirley King, Arizona’s Bad News Blues Band, and other wonderful players. Kilborn Alley has opened for Kenny Wayne Shepherd, Shemekia Copeland, T-Model Ford, Tommy Castro, and Artie “Blues Boy” White. They have been on the bill with the late Little Milton on three occasions, plus Pinetop Perkins, Sam Lay, Hubert Sumlin, Elvin Bishop, Lonnie Brooks, Rod Piazza and the Mighty Flyers, Delbert McClinton, the late Willie Kent, Guitar Shorty, Billy Branch, Watermelon Slim, The Kinsey Report, Deborah Coleman, The Mannish Boys, Michael Burks, Jody Williams, Magic Slim, Denise LaSalle, Willie “Big Eyes” Smith, Bob Margolin, Carol Fran, Magic Dick, Reneé Austin, Fruteland Jackson, Rita Chiarelli, Otis Taylor, Jimmy Burns, James Harman, Sean Costello, E.C. Scott, Fiona Boyes, Jason Ricci, Hollywood Blue Flames, Roy Hytower, Cash McCall, Floyd Taylor, Andrew “Jr. Boy” Jones, Mofro, and many others—and this does not even count those who played the BMA’s in Memphis in 2007.

The eagerly anticipated follow-up to the Blues Music Award-nominated Put It In The Alley! The members of The Kilborn Alley Blues Band - Andrew Duncanson, Joe Asselin, Chris Breen, Josh Stimmel, and Ed O'Hara - are a true band, together of personal volition and sheer joy. According to Chicago blues matriarch Mary Lane, "You meet a lot of people in a lifetime in music, and the guys in Kilborn Alley are the kind I can say I am glad to know. They have that crazy love for blues and stay true to it." Nick Moss produced the recording and joins the band on guitar on three tracks. Also guesting are Gerry Hundt and Abraham Johnson.
**
Nick Moss- Guitar
Gerry Hundt(Guest)- Organ
Abraham Johnson (Guest)- Vocals
Andrew Duncanson- Vocals, Guitar
Chirs Breen- Bass Guitar
Dave Fauble- Saxophone
Ed O'Hara- Drums
Joe Asselin- Harmonica
Josh Stimmel- Guitar
*
01. I'm Spent (4:19)
02. Christmas In County (4:42)
03. Fire With Fire (3:38)
04. Crazier Things (4:49)
05. Come Home Soon (3:39)
06. Redneck In A Soul Band (2:52)
07. It's A Pity (6:33)
08. Tear Chicago Down (3:13)
09. The Weight On You (4:14)
10. Lay It Down (3:35)
11. She Don't Know (3:01)
12. Redneck In A Soul Band (Alt) (3:04)
**
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Lightnin' HOPKINS - Lightnin' And The Blues


Lightnin' HOPKINS  - Lightnin' And The Blues
JAPAN Ltd.Ed ISSUE MINI LP CD

Blues

NO COMMENTS.
**
01.Nothin’ But The Blues
02.Don’t Think ’Cause You’re Pretty (Blues Is A Mighty Bad Feelin’)
03.Lightnin’s Boogie (Boogie Woogie Dance)
04.Life I Used To Live (Gonna Change My Ways)
05.Sick Feeling Blues (I’m Achin’)
06.Evil Hearted Woman
07.Blues For My Cookie
08.Sittin’ Down Thinkin’
09.My Baby’s Gone
10.Lonesome In Your Home
11.Lightnin’s Special (Flash Lightnin’)
12.My Little Kewpie Doll (Bad Boogie)
13.I Love You Baby
14.Shine On Moon
15.Had A Gal Called Sal
16.Hopkins’ Sky Hop
17.Lightnin’ Don’t Feel Well (I Wonder What Is Wrong With Me)
18.Finally Me My Baby
19.That’s Alright Baby
20.Don’t Need No Job
21. Blue Is A Mighty Bad Feeling
22.Remember Me *
23.Grandma’s Boogie (Lightnin’s Stomp)
24.Please Don’t Go Baby
25.Early Mornin’ Boogie (Hear Me Talkin’)
26.Moving On Out Boogie (Let’s Move)
**
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Airto MOREIRA Featuring Flora PURIM - Seeds On The Ground 1970


Airto MOREIRA Featuring Flora PURIM - Seeds On The Ground 1970

Jazz

Airto Moreira was born in 1941 in the small village of Itaiopolis - south Brasil, and was raised in Curitiba. Even before he could walk he would start shaking and banging on the floor every time the radio played a hot song. This worried his mother, but his grandmother recognized his potential and encouraged him to express himself. By the time he was six years old he had won many music contests by singing and playing percussion. The city gave him his own radio program every Saturday afternoon. At thirteen he became a professional musician, playing percussion, drums, and singing in local dance bands. He moved to Sao Paulo at the age of sixteen and performed regularly in nightclubs and television as a percussionist, drummer and singer.

In 1965 he met the singer Flora Purim in Rio de Janeiro. Flora moved to the USA in 1967 and Airto followed her shortly after. When in New York Airto began playing with musicians such as Reggie Workman, JJ Johnson, Cedar Walton and bassist Walter Booker. It was through Booker that Airto began playing with the greats - Cannonball Adderley, Lee Morgan, Paul Desmond and Joe Zawinul, to name a few. Zawinul recommended Airto to Miles Davis for a recording session in 1970 for the “Bitches Brew” album. Davis then invited Airto to join his group, which included such jazz icons as Wayne Shorter, Dave Holland, Jack De Johnette, Chick Corea and later John McLaughlin and Keith Jarrett. He remained with Miles for two years, and appears on such releases as “Live/Evil”, “Live at the Fillmore”, “On the Corner”, “The Isle of Wight”, “Bitches Brew” and later releases including the “Fillmore Sessions”.
**
You don't need to understand a word of Portuguese to know when a Purim song speaks of ecstasy or anguish, of delight or desolation, of laughter or loneliness. It's all there in the performance.
**
Ron Carter- Bass, Cello
Severino de Oliveira- Organ, Accordion, Viola
Airto Moreira- Percussion, Drums, Vocals, Berimbau
Hermeto Pascoal- Bass, Flute, Piano, Harpsichord, Keyboards, Violao
Flora Purim- Vocals
Dom Um Romão- Percussion
Sivuca- Accordion
**
A1. Andei (I Walked) 2:40
    Bass - Ron Carter
    Vocals, Percussion, Berimbau - Airto*
    Written-By, Harpsichord, Flute - Hermeto Pascoal
A2. O Sonho (Moon Dreams) 7:45
    Bass - Ron Carter
    Drums, Percussion - Airto*
    Keyboards - Hermeto Pascoal
    Vocals - Flora Purim
    Written By - J. Livingston & R. Evans (Group 88 Music - ASCAP)
A3. Uri (Wind) 6:10
    Accordion - Sivuca
    Bass, Cello - Ron Carter
    Flute [Bass], Acoustic Guitar [Violão], Voice, Written-by - Hermeto Pascoal
    Viola - Severino De Oliveira*
    Vocals, Drums, Percussion, Voice - Airto*
    Vocals, Voice - Flora Purim
    Voice, Written-By - Googie*
A4. Papo Furado (Jive Talking) 3:29
    Acoustic Guitar [Caipira], Voice - Severino De Oliveira*
    Bass, Voice - Ron Carter
    Percussion, Voice - Dom Um Romod*
    Vocals, Percussion, Voice - Airto*
    Written-by, Acoustic Guitar [Violão], Voice - Hermeto Pascoal
B1. Juntos (We Love) 3:22
    Bass - Ron Carter
    Drums, Percussion - Airto*
    Organ - Severino De Oliveira*
    Percussion - Dom Um Romod*
    Written-By, Vocals - Flora Purim
    Written-by, Flute [Bass], Piano - Hermeto Pascoal
B2. O Galho Da Roseira (The Branches Of The Rose Tree) 7:54
    Acoustic Guitar [Violão], Accordion - Severino De Oliveira*
    Bass - Ron Carter
    Percussion - Dom Um Romod*
    Vocals - Flora Purim
    Written-by, Keyboards, Other [Japanese Sapho] - Hermeto Pascoal
B3. O Galho Da Roseira (The Branches Of The Rose Tree) Part II 8:21
    Acoustic Guitar [Violão], Accordion - Severino De Oliveira*
    Bass - Ron Carter
    Percussion - Dom Um Romod*
    Vocals - Flora Purim
    Written-by, Keyboards, Other [Japanese Sapho] - Hermeto Pascoal
**
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John COLTRANE & Alice COLTRANE - Cosmic Music 1966


John COLTRANE & Alice COLTRANE - Cosmic Music 1966

Jazz

This album features two tracks by the John Coltrane group, i.e. tracks # 1 & 3. This recording is especially interesting because it features the first recordings of the new John Coltrane group after the departure of McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones. And from the first note, you hear the difference. This is not meant to degrade the truly great work of McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones, but Coltrane's music on this record sounds as if it has been freed, in some way. I really love the preceding studio recording, "Meditations", but this record sounds much freer in some ways, and that is because McCoy Tyner and Elvin Jones had different musical conceptions, which were incompatilble with the direction Coltrane was going to take. And this recording is the perfect example. "Manifestation" features a freely pulsating rhythm which provides the two tenors with a ground from where to start their flight. And what a flight it is! Alice Coltrane's piano solo is really capturing, also proving that she is more suitable for this kind of music than her predecessor. Then, the two tenors pick up again, this time both at the same time. Pharoh Sanders can also be heard on piccolo on this tune, which adds an interesting note. Track #3, "Reverend King", is a real gem: it features John Coltrane on bass clarinet. While he may not have mastered this instrument as perfectly as all kinds of saxophones, it is most fascinating to hear him play it. The song starts with an incantation by Coltrane and Sanders, then the theme is played by Coltrane on bass clarinet, and then he pauses, giving room to excellent solos by the other players, only to return towards the end of the piece, playing one of his most intense performances ever. The piece closes with the repating of the theme and the incantation from the beginning. Those two pieces of music are only 22 minutes long, combined.The other two tracks were recorded by Alice Coltrane in 1968, after the death of her husband. It features Pharoah Sanders, and I also like these two tracks.There are said to be more pieces from these sessions, still unreleased and, unfortunately, buried somewhere in some archive, so that they haven't been found yet. One can only hope that they will see the light of day sometime, so that these stunning sessions can be released in their entirety.
**
Jimmy Garrison- Bass
Ben Riley (tracks: A2, B2) , Rashied Ali (tracks: A1, B1)- Drums, Percussion
Pharoah Sanders- Flute, Saxophone, Vocals
Ray Appleton (tracks: A1, B1)- Percussion
Alice Coltrane- Piano  
John Coltrane (tracks: A1, B1)- Saxophone, Clarinet, Vocals
**
A1. Manifestation 11:37
A2. Lord Help Me To Be 7:29
B1. Reverend King 11:00
B2. The Sun 4:02
(Tracks 1 and 3 are John Coltrane's last recordings from 1966 and then tracks 2 and 4 are Alice Coltrane's from 1968.)
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David KIKOSKI & Eddie GoMEZ & Al FOSTER - Presage 1989


David KIKOSKI & Eddie GoMEZ & Al FOSTER - Presage 1989

Jazz

At a time when jazz has been to the far reaches of the musical universe and back, some would say that its all been played before and we're currently at a point in the cyclical nature of this art form when those with lesser talents are merely rewriting the past.

Possibly this is why innovation and individualism are so rare these days and why David Kikoski stands apart from the scores of pianists who currently make their home within the mainstream tradition.

Born in 1961, Dave was part of a musical family and given his first piano lessons at the age of six by his father. In his early teens he began working with jazz and rock groups and won “The New Jersey Allstate Jazz Competition “. After high school, Kikoski would head to the prestigious Berklee College of Music in Boston where he earned a bachelor's degree in piano. While at school he had a steady trio gig and met Pat Metheny who sat in with the band. A few years later they would record a CD together with Roy Haynes.

In 1984, the pianist decided to try his hand in New York where it didn't take long for him to establish himself. Drummer Roy Haynes would be the first to give Kikoski a break, leading to a productive association that lasts to this day.

During his first few years on the New York scene, the pianist took advantage of the Haynes gig to network with other musicians leading to a wealth of recording opportunities and touring with Randy Brecker, Joe Henderson, Ron Carter, Al Foster, Buster Williams and Bob Berg among others.

By 1989, Dave was ready to cut his first record as a leader. “Presage” featured a high-octane trio with bassist Eddie Gomez and drummer Al Foster. His second outing “Persistant Dreams” was produced by Walter Becker of Steely Dan fame featured a larger ensemble including Randy Brecker and Billy Hart.
From AAJ.
**
David Kikoski- Piano synthesizers
Eddie Gomez- Bass
Al Foster- Drums
**
01. Hope 8:12
02. Blue Times 8:34
03. In the Still of the Night 6:16
04. Presage 5:58
05. Dirty Dogs 8:34
06. I’ve Got you under my Skin 6:34
07. Doorways 4:37
08. A Nightingale Sang in Berkeley Square 4:03
**
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Grant GREEN - Live at the Lighthouse 1972


Grant GREEN - Live at the Lighthouse 1972
Remastered Edd. 1998

Jazz

Some of Grant Green's hottest moments as a jazz-funk bandleader came on his live records of the era, which were filled with extended, smoking grooves and gritty ensemble interplay. Live at the Lighthouse makes a fine companion piece to the excellent Alive!, though there are some subtle differences which give the album its own distinct flavor. For starters, the average track length is even greater, with four of the six jams clocking in at over 12 minutes. That makes it easy to get lost in the grooves as the musicians ride and work them over. What's more, the rhythmic foundation of the group is noticeably altered. Live at the Lighthouse is one of the few Green albums of the period not to feature loose-limbed funky drummer Idris Muhammad, and his spare, booming sound and direct James Brown inspiration give way to the busy, bubbling, frequently up-tempo polyrhythms of drummer Greg Williams and extra percussionist Bobbye Porter Hall. They push the rest of the group to cook up a storm on tracks like "Windjammer" (which is taken at a madly up-tempo pace compared to the version on Green Is Beautiful), Donald Byrd's modal piece "Fancy Free" (which features some of Green's best soloing of the date), and organist Shelton Laster's soulful original "Flood in Franklin Park." Laster winds up as probably the most impassioned soloist, breaking out of the pocket for some spiralling, hard-swinging flights. For his part, Green works the grooves more... with the ease of a soul-jazz veteran used to the concept. The results make Live at the Lighthouse one of his best, most organic jazz-funk outings. [The CD reissue excises four spoken DJ intros from the original double LP in order to fit all the music on one disc.]
By Steve Huey, All Music Guide.
**
Grant Green- Guitar
Claude Bartee- Soprano and Tenor Saxophones
Willie Bivens- Vibes
Shelton Laster- Organ
Wilton Felder- Electric Bass
Greg Williams- Drums
Bobbye Porter Hall- Percussion
**
01. Introduction By Hank Stewart
02. Windjammer
03. Betcha By Golly Wow
04. Fancy Free
05. Flood In Franklin Park
06. Jan Jan
07. Walk In The Night
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Aurex Jazz Festival '81 - Allstar Jam Session 1981


Aurex Jazz Festival '81 - Allstar Jam Session 1981

Jazz

This anthology LP contains excerpts from several concerts recorded during a September 1981 tour of Japan by a rotating cast of all-stars. While some of the musicians had previously worked together, it was clearly a jam session that came out quite well in all instances. Freddie Hubbard is heard leading a quartet with Roland Hanna, Ray Brown, and Art Blakey (who provide the rhythm section on most tracks, while occasionally omitting Hanna), performing "Crisis" and a stimulating take of "A Night in Tunisia." Gerry Mulligan and Bob Brookmeyer had toured and recorded together on many occasions, so their great playing on "Bernie's Tune" is no surprise. Hanna's piano takes over for Brookmeyer during Mulligan's warm tribute to Billy Strayhorn, "Song for Strayhorn." Milt Jackson's bluesy take of "What Am I Here For?" is a treat, as is his interaction with Stan Getz on "The Girl From Ipanema." Solo features include Brown's lively medley from the Ellington songbook and Hanna's upbeat "Time for the Dancers." The entire cast joins forces for a crowd-pleasing workout of Jackson's "Bag's Groove." Because this Japanese LP seems to have had limited distribution worldwide, it may be rather difficult to locate, but it is well worth the effort.
By Ken Dryden, All Music Guide.
**
Art Blakey- Drums
Freddie Hubbard- Trumpet
Stan Getz- Tenor Sax
Gerry Mulligan- Baritone Sax
Bob Brookmeyer- Trombone
Milt Jackson- Vibes
Roland Hanna- Piano
Ray Brown- Bass
**
Side 1
01. Crisis 8:50
02. Bernie's Tune 3:52
03. Song For Strayhorn 2:21
04. What Am I Here For 4:42
05. Take The A Train ~ Caravan ~ Things Ain't What They Used To Be 4:05

Side 2
01. A Night In Tunisia 8:22
02. Time For The Dancers 6:03
03. The Girl From Ipanema 5:09
04. Bag's Groove 6:25
**
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Joe ZAWINUL - The Rise & Fall Of The Third Stream 1968


Joe ZAWINUL - The Rise & Fall Of The Third Stream 1968

Jazz

This transitional recording sees Joe Zawinul moving from the role of jazz pianist to that of a synthesist in the broad sense of the word. The recording, made up of advanced hard bop and post bop themes, includes -- with varying degrees of cohesion -- passages for cello and violas. The strings never completely meld with the jazz instrumentation, but they also don't get in the way. The title suggests Zawinul sees little value in partitioning music under such headings as "third stream" (a rubric for the fusion of jazz and classical music). This view would be famously exemplified in the influential projects with which Zawinul would soon be involved.
Zawinul sticks with acoustic piano except for "Soul of a Village", where he improvises in a soul jazz vein on Fender Rhodes over the tamboura-like droning of a prepared piano. On other tracks, his playing is similar to the sweeping grandeur of McCoy Tyner. Elsewhere, he is in more of a Keith Jarrett or Bill Evans space. There's good work from Jimmy Owens on trumpet and William Fischer on tenor sax, along with a top-flight rhythm section: bassist Richard Davis and either Freddie Waits or Roy McCurdy on drums.
What's interesting about this music is the insight it provides on directions Zawinul would soon take with Miles Davis on the ethereal In a Silent Way, on the impressionistic 1971 eponymous release Zawinul, and then with the borderless fusioneering of Weather Report. These later projects are the realization of ideas that Zawinul was beginning to form on this 1967 session. ~ Jim Todd
Long before he set the jazz world on its ear with the legendary fusion band Weather Report, Joe Zawinul was featured as pianist and composer for Cannonball Adderley and Miles Davis. In 1968, Zawinul recorded THE RISE & FALL OF THE THIRD STREAM for Atlantic. The album was re-released on CD in 1999, and it's great to have it back. The album's title refers to one of the first conscious fusion movements of jazz in the early '60s, a union of jazz and classical music.
With THE RISE & FALL OF THE THIRD STREAM, Zawinul draws equally from European classical music and from the gospel and blues roots of jazz, achieving a virtually perfect balance of the cerebral and the earthy. The instrumentation is unique, as the keyboard/horns/bass/drums band is joined by a string quartet oddly capable of conveying a strong blues feeling. Jimmy Owens contributes sterling trumpet work, and William Fischer (better known as a "classical" composer) plays stark, probing tenor saxophone. If you appreciate both classical music and the blues, the excellent RISE & FALL is for you.
Long before he set the jazz world on its ear with the legendary fusion band Weather Report, Joe Zawinul was featured as pianist and composer for Cannonball Adderley and Miles Davis. In 1968, Zawinul recorded THE RISE & FALL OF THE THIRD STREAM for Atlantic. The album was re-released on CD in 1999, and it's great to have it back. The album's title refers to one of the first conscious fusion movements of jazz in the early '60s, a union of jazz and classical music.
With THE RISE & FALL OF THE THIRD STREAM, Zawinul draws equally from European classical music and from the gospel and blues roots of jazz, achieving a virtually perfect balance of the cerebral and the earthy. The instrumentation is unique, as the keyboard/horns/bass/drums band is joined by a string quartet oddly capable of conveying a strong blues feeling. Jimmy Owens contributes sterling trumpet work, and William Fischer (better known as a "classical" composer).
**
William Fisher- Tenor Sax
Richard Davis- Bass 
Kermit Moore- Cello - 
Freddie Waits, Roy McCurdy- Drums
Warren Smith- Percussion 
Joe Zawinul-Piano, Electric Piano
Jimmy Owens- Trumpet  
Alfred Brown, Selwart Clarke, Theodore Israel- Viola 
**
A1   Baptismal 7:37  
A2a  The Soul Of A Village (Part I) 2:13   
A2b  The Soul Of A Village (Part II) 4:12   
A3   The Fifth Canto 6:55 
B1   From Vienna, With Love 4:27   
B2   Lord, Lord, Lord 3:55  
B3   A Concerto, Retitled 5:30  
**
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Thursday, November 26, 2009

Johnny WINTER - John Dawson Winter III 1974


Johnny WINTER - John Dawson Winter III 1974

Blues

Johnny Winter, his brother Edgar and Rick Derringer form an American rock triumvirate that knows little competition. John Dawson Winter III further refines the oldest's progression from an overanxious white bluesman with a restrained voice into a tasteful and raunch rocker.
Winter the guitarist is a constant powerhouse who leaves few spaces in his frequent solos. Delivering cluster after cluster of rapidly picked notes or soaring chords, he has developed a discernible, if not virtuoso, style to replace the awkward pastiches of Chuck Berry and B.B. King that flawed his early work. Interestingly, Winter opts for less use of distortion than do most guitarists of this ilk.
He composes smartly. Knowing that even the simplest change can revitalize an otherwise staid 12-bar blues, Winter inserts a time-tested ascending chord sequence into the ninth and tenth bars of "Pick Up on My Mojo." Yet he can also succeed with a haunting, gently sung "Stranger," a pop piece reminiscent of Edgar.
But it's never a one-man show. Randy Jo Hobbs's bass combines treble tones with the mandatory bottom sound, and muscular drum rolls from Richard Hughes propel the meatier tracks which dominate the album. Wisely, Winter continues to borrow from other writers: Derringer, John Lennon and Allen Toussaint are all well represented. Shelly Yackus's crisp production shows the proper measure of control.
John Dawson Winter III is not without flaws -- his vocal on "Sweet Papa John," a blues patterned after the earliest Muddy Waters sides, returns to the thin huskiness he has mostly mastered, and the horns on two cuts would have been best omitted. Still, Winter displays an unmistakable maturity that few rock artists achieve.
By Charley Waters, Rolling Stone, 1/30/75.
**
01.Rock & roll people
    Writer: John Lennon (Lennon Music/ATV Music Corp./BMI/1974)
    Lead Vocal: Johnny Winter Guitars: Johnny Winter Bass: Randy Jo Hobbs Drums: Richard Hughes
    Percussion: Richard Hughes and Randy Jo Hobbs
    Handclaps: The Group
02.Golden olden day's of rock and roll
    Writer: Vic Thomas (Pocketful of Tunes, Inc. & Papa Toad Music, Inc./BMI/1973)
    Lead Vocal: Johnny Winter
    Guitar: Johnny Winter
    Bass: Randy Jo Hobbs
    Drums: Richard Hughes
    Percussion: Randy Jo Hobbs and Richard Hughes
    Handclaps: The rlre p Piano: Kenny Ascher
    Backing Vocals: Johnny Winter, Tasha Thomas,
    Carl Hall, Monica Burruss
    Horn Arrangement: Edgar Winter
    Trumpet: RBaritone Sax: Lew Del Gatto
03.Self-destructive blues
    Writer: Johnny Winter (Winter Blues Music, Inc./BMI/1974)
    Lead Vocal: Johnny Winter Guitar: Johnny Winter Bass: Randy Jo Hobbs Drums: Richard Hughes
04.Raised on rock
    Writer: Mark James (Screen Gems-Columbia Music, Inc. & Sweet Glory Music, Inc./BMI/1973)
    Lead Vocal: Johnny Winter
    Guitars: Johnny Winter
    Bass: Randy Jo Hobbs
    Drums: Richard Hughes
    Percussion: Richard Hughes and Randy Jo Hobbs
    Harpsichord: Edgar Winter
    Lap Steel: Paul Prestopino
    Backing Vocals: Jackdaw and Dennis Ferrante
05.Stranger
    Writer: Johnny Winter (Winter Blues Music, Inc./BMI/1974)
    Lead Vocal: Johnny Winter
    Guitars: Johnny Winter
    Bass: Randy Jo Hobbs
    Drums: Richard Hughes
    Piano and Solina Strings: Edgar Winter
06.Mind over matter
    Writer: Allen Toussaint (Marsaint & Warner-Tamberlane Music, Inc./BMI/1974)
    Lead Vocal: Johnny Winter
    Guitars: Johnny Winter
    Bass: Randy Jo Hobbs
    Drums: Richard Hughes
    Percussion: Randy Jo Hobbs and Richard Hughes
    Backing Vocals: Johnny Winter
07.Roll with me
    Writer: Rick Derringer (Derringer Music, Inc./BMI/1974)
    Lead Vocal: Johnny Winter
    Guitars: Johnny Winter
    Bass: Randy Jo Hobbs
    Drums: Richard Hughes
    Percussion: Rick Derringer and Paul Prestopino
    Backing Vocals: Johnny Winter and Rick Derringer
08.Love song to me
    Writer: Johnny Winter (Winter Blues Music, lnc./BMI/1974)
    Lead Vocal: Johnny Winter
    Guitars: Johnny Winter
    Bass: Randy Jo Hobbs
    Drums: Richard Hughes
    Banjo and Dobro: Paul Prestopino
    Pedal Steel: Rick Derringer
    Backing Vocals: Johnny Winter
    Buried Highpart: Dennis Ferrante
09.Pick up on my mojo
    Writer: Johnny Winter (Winter Blues Music, Inc./BMI/1974)
    Lead Vocal: Johnny Winter
    Lead and Rhythm Guitars: Johnny Winter
    Additional Guitar and Bass: Randy Jo Hobbs
    Drums: Richard Hughes
    Percussion: Richard Hughes and Randy Jo Hobbs
    Handclaps: The Group
10.Lay down your sorrows
    Writers: Cynthia Weil and Barry Mann (Screen Gems-Columbia Music, Inc. & Summerhill Songs,   Inc./BMI/1974)
    Lead Vocal: Johnny Winter
    Guitar: Johnny Winter
    Bass: Randy Jo Hobbs
    Drums: Richard Hughes
    Piano, Solina Strings, and
    Organ: Edgar Winter
    Backing Vocals: Tasha Thomas, Carl Hall, Monica Burruss
    Horn Arrangement: Edgar Winter Trumpet: Randy Brecker Trumpet: Lou Soloff Tenor
   Sax: Mike Brecker    Trombone: Dave Taylor Baritone Sax: Lew  Del Gatto
11.Sweet papa John
    Writer: Johnny Winter (Winter Blues Music, Inc./BMI/1974)
    Lead Vocal: Johnny Winter
    Guitars: Johnny Winter
    Bass Drum: Richard Hughes
**
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